Current Developments

Grundrechte schützen – eine grenzenlose Verpflichtung?

Die Anwendbarkeit deutscher Grundrechte in der Tätigkeit des BND aus völkerrechtlicher Perspektive

Mit Spannung konnte man in der letzten Woche eine außergewöhnliche Verhandlung vor dem Bundesverfassungsgericht verfolgen. Die geheimste deutsche Behörde, der Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), musste sich im Rahmen einer Verfassungsbeschwerde den kritischen Fragen der höchsten deutschen Richterinnen und Richter stellen. Die Verfassungsbeschwerde richtet sich gegen das novellierte Gesetz über den Bundesnachrichtendienst (BNDG), welches eine umfassende Überwachung von Auslandskommunikation ermöglicht, und deshalb eine Verletzung von Art. 10 GG darstelle. Zentral war dabei eine …

READ MORE →

Interview

Awarding inspiration

A conversation with Nico Krisch on the occasion of the awarding ceremony of the Max-Planck-Cambridge Prize of International Law

In 2018 the Max Planck Society established the Max Planck-Cambridge Prize for International Law (MaxCamPIL), a research prize awarded jointly by the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law (MPIL) and the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL) at the University of Cambridge. The MaxCamPIL aims at highlighting the relevance of fundamental research in the field of international law in a phase of reconfiguration of the global …

READ MORE →

Event

Awarding inspiration

Watch the video of the conversation with Nico Krisch on the occasion of the ceremony of the Max-Planck-Cambridge Prize of International Law

In 2018 the Max Planck Society established the Max Planck-Cambridge Prize for International Law (MaxCamPIL), a research prize awarded jointly by the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law (MPIL) and the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (LCIL) at the University of Cambridge. The MaxCamPIL aims at highlighting the relevance of fundamental research in the field of international law in a phase of reconfiguration of the global …

READ MORE →

Current Developments

SDGs and the rule of law: the need to globalize the ethics of legal tech

In the context of the rapid adoption and integration of legal technology at a global level, this blog will problematize the consequences of the bias of current discussions on the ethics of legal tech in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs strongly emphasize the importance of the rule of law as a basis for development.  While there is a fast-growing literature on the ethics of legal …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

Crisis and hypocrisy?

(Not) A final word on our symposium

The Book Review Symposium on Feminist Engagement with International Law has been taking place against the backdrop of multiple crises. The crisis that has been dominating the news worldwide is one that culminated in the killing of Qassem Soleimani, in Iranian attacks on a US military base on Iraqi territory, and in the downing of a civilian airplane. It is unclear what the mid- and long-term fall-out of this crisis …

READ MORE →

Current Developments

Zur Tötung von Qasem Soleimani: Wann darf man Soldaten töten?

Der tödliche Drohnenangriff auf Qasem Soleimani und Mitglieder der „Popular Mobilization Forces“, darunter deren Anführer Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, wirft eine Reihe rechtlicher Fragen auf. Neben dem (an dieser Stelle nicht näher behandelten) ius ad bellum und dem US-Verfassungsrecht betrifft das auch das Recht auf Leben und das humanitäre Völkerrecht: Schon jetzt ist klar, dass die traditionelle Definition internationaler bewaffneter Konflikte bei gezielten Tötungen an ihre Grenzen stößt. Zeit, hier nachzuschärfen. Ein …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

Intersectional feminist engagements with international law (Part II)

An interview with Emilia Roig

In this second part of our interview with CIJ founder and executive director Emilia Roig, we move from general questions on intersectionality and the category ‘women’ to more specific questions on practical engagement with international law.   The practice-oriented chapters of the Elgar Research Handbook focus on feminist engagement within traditional social and legal institutions, such as diplomacy, international organizations, and courts. What is the perspective of the CIJ on …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

Intersectional feminist engagements with international law (Part I)

An interview with Emilia Roig

Most contributions to our online review symposium argue in favor of an intersectional approach. Legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term ‘intersectionality’ in 1989. Crenshaw is also the president of the Berlin-based Center for Intersectional Justice (CIJ). Völkerrechtsblog had the pleasure of talking to the founder and executive director of the CIJ, Dr. Emilia Zenzile Roig.   The CIJ advocates for an intersectional approach to anti-discrimination law and policy. Can …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

Whose womanhood? Feminist postcolonial approaches to law

In July 2019, shortly before her election as the first ever female president of the European Commission, German centre-right minister of defence Ursula von der Leyen introduced the Hashtag #EuropeIsAWoman. Who did she mean by this invocation of womanhood? After all, during her preceding posts as family and as employment minister, her policies of gender equality – for example, women quotas in advisory boards of stock-listed corporations and amendments regarding …

READ MORE →

Current Developments

The targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani – a short recapitulation

A lot has been said, written and tweeted about the targeted killing of Qassem Soleimani and the aftermath since his death on January 3. This post aims to organize the jumble and point to remaining open questions in international law. The incident may not only shape the near future of state relations in the Middle East, it will also get its place in history through the legal assessment, because the …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

TWAILing feminist engagement with international law: Toward an intersectional governance feminism

The recently published Handbook on Feminist Engagement with International Law [’the Handbook’] does not only provide a glimpse at the breadth of contemporary critical feminist international law scholarship, but, perhaps more importantly, it surveys potential futures for the field. In other words, it is not necessarily an exercise in taking stock as much as it is one in contemplating different visions for critical, feminist approaches to international law. This is …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

The problem of “sport sex”

Reflections on de-essentialising gender and globalising law

Female track athletes with certain differences of sex development (DSD) are now barred from the women’s category of international competition – that is, unless they undergo procedures to “normalise” the atypically high amount of testosterone produced by their bodies. These regulations establish an exception to the general rule that the women’s category is open to all athletes – just as they are – who have been legally recognised from birth …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

‘It’s not a research gap, it’s a research crevasse!’

To kick off our book symposium on the Research Handbook on Feminist Engagement with International Law, Völkerrechtsblog’s Isabel Lischewski talks to editors Susan Harris Rimmer, Associate Professor, Griffith University Law School, Brisbane, and Kate Ogg, Senior Lecturer, ANU College of Law, The Australian National University, Canberra.   For many people unfamiliar with the concept, it might not be immediately apparent what feminist engagement with international law brings to the table …

READ MORE →

Book ReviewFeminist Engagement with International LawSymposium

Book Symposium on “Feminist Engagement with International Law”

A note from the editors

“Feminist analysis is like friendship: an ongoing process of deepening complexity, interactive, contradictory, insightful, emotional, enlightening, challenging, conflicting”, Nancy O. Dowd wrote in her introduction to Feminist Legal Theory: An Anti-essentialist Reader (2003). She was specifically referring to the complex relationship feminist (legal) theory has with itself and its many conflicting claims for representation. Mapping this often ridiculously complicated web of relationships, including both bonds of solidarity and potential mechanisms …

READ MORE →

AnnouncementsVölkerrechtsblog

Most-read posts in 2019 and other insights from our backend

After a little break, we start 2020 with an overview of the 15 most-read posts in 2019 and some other interesting numbers from our statistics. What is striking is that the majority of the posts that received most views last year are not from 2019, but have been written in prior years. This means that posts do not necessarily receive most klicks on the day or even month they are …

READ MORE →

BofaxeCurrent Developments

All eyes on the Court

On the ICJ hearings on provisional measures in The Gambia v. Myanmar

Whilst Myanmar’s treatment of the Rohingya minority has long been subject to public scrutiny, in November news broke that The Gambia instituted proceedings against Myanmar before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) under Article IX of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Genocide Convention) for the alleged genocide against the Rohingya Muslim minority. Last week’s hearings were confined to The Gambia’s request for provisional …

READ MORE →