DiscussionResponse

Im „Handelskrieg“ schweigen die Gesetze

Im gegenwärtigen Disput zwischen den USA auf der einen und einer Reihe von anderen WTO-Mitgliedern auf der anderen Seite stößt das Welthandelsrecht an seine Grenzen. Die US-Zölle verstoßen jedenfalls gegen WTO-Recht, auch eine Berufung auf mögliche Ausnahmen erscheint höchst fragwürdig. Allerdings steht auch die Reaktion der EU auf rechtlich wackeligen Beinen. Die US-Zölle und das WTO-Recht Trumps größte Sorge gilt China, forderte er doch bereits im Zuge seines Wahlkampfs die …

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Current DevelopmentsResponse

Plausibility and the ICJ

A response to Somos and Sparks

Since the ICJ’s 2001 decision in LaGrand (Germany v US), the Court’s jurisprudence on provisional measures indicated under Article 41 of its Statute has expanded dramatically. This is for two reasons—both, in my mind, connected to LaGrand. In the first place, with the Court having declared its provisional measures binding, it was incumbent upon it to ensure their requirements were clear and predictable. In the second (and in view of …

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DiscussionResponse

Taking Trump Seriously

Why international lawyers are at loss in dealing with Trump

In her recent contribution “Trump’s latest attack on international law”, Lena Riemer very accurately points out the threat to international customs and institutions posed by Trump and – currently – by his candidate for the US Supreme Court: Brett Kavanaugh. She demonstrates how Kavanaugh has repeatedly shown disrespect for humanitarian law and human rights in his career as a judge for the Federal Court of Appeals for the District of …

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Discussion

Data Protection Principles Around the World

Do They Violate International Investment Law?

There has been a recent surge in the proliferation of data protection regulations globally, the most recent example of which is the General Data Protection Regulation. Since data protection laws across the world have become increasingly extra-territorial in their reach, there is a higher propensity for foreign entities to be affected by them.

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Current Developments

The urgent, the plausible and the irreparable

The significance of lowering ICJ thresholds for provisional measures

The ICJ’s decision on Iran’s application for provisional measures in its high-profile proceedings against the United States of America for alleged violations of their 1955 Treaty of Amity was handed down on Wednesday. This tightly constrained and circumscribed stage of the proceedings, though only a precursor to the far more significant jurisdictional and merits stages—each of which has the potential to ask questions with lasting significance for international law and …

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DiscussionKick-off

Will Tariff Wars Unravel the Multilateral Trading System?

History is not unfamiliar with the rigours of tariff wars. Back in the 1930s, retaliatory tariff escalation led to the great depression, which in turn contributed to the Second World War. Leaders of the free world sought to revive the beleaguered global economy through free and fair trade. Years of negotiations aimed at increasing market access and curtailing protectionism culminated in the establishment of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The …

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Zwischen Recht und Politik

Die Rechts- und Eigentumsverhältnisse an Kulturgütern der Kolonialzeit nach deutschem Zivilrecht und Völkerrecht

Bisher „ungedachte juristische Konstruktionen“ wünscht sich Bénédicte Savoy, wenn sie in ihrem jüngsten Werk über die Zukunft des (kolonialen) Kulturerbes nachdenkt. Doch wie ist eigentlich die Rechtslage an kolonialen Kulturobjekten? Bestehen Ansprüche zur Rückforderung solcher Güter? Diese Fragen hat unlängst der Deutsche Museumsbund in einem „Leitfaden zum Umgang mit Sammlungsgut aus kolonialen Kontexten“ aufgegriffen (S. 65 ff.). Befund der Analyse: Ansprüche auf Rückforderung kolonialer Kulturgüter bestehen weder nach deutschem Zivilrecht noch nach …

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Current Developments

Kofi Annan and International Law in Kenya

Dr. Kofi Annan, the former Secretary General of the United Nations, died recently. Many Kenyans took to social media to mourn the death of the African diplomat they had come to know through his efforts in curbing the 2008 post-election violence. Annan and the 2007 Election in Kenya The 2007 election in Kenya was charged and emotive. Mr. Raila Odinga, the then President Kibaki’s main challenger, had assembled an impressive …

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Current Developments

On the decriminalisation of homosexuality in India

With its judgment of 6 September 2018 (Navtej Johar v Union of India), the Indian Supreme Court has put an end to the criminalisation of same-sex acts between consenting adults, allowing the country’s LGBT+ community to celebrate a long overdue win after a nearly two decades lasting fight for legal recognition. The law in question, Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), introduced in the 19th century under British colonial …

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Call for ContributionsEvent

Conference Announcement and CfP: Cynical International Law?

A joint conference by AjV and DGIR, supported by Völkerrechtsblog

Völkerrechtsblog is proud to announce its support of a joint conference of the Working Group of Young Scholars in Public International Law (Arbeitskreis junger Völkerrechtswissenschaftler*innen – AjV) and the German Society of International Law (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationales Recht – DGIR) on the topic of

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Artefact or heritage?

Colonial collections in Western museums from the perspective of international (human rights) law

“One of the most noble incarnations of a people’s genius is its cultural heritage. The vicissitudes of history have nevertheless robbed many peoples of this inheritance. They .. have not only been despoiled of .. masterpieces but (were) also robbed of a memory .. These men and women have the right to recover these cultural assets which are part of their being…“ [Secr.Gen. UNESCO M’Bow, 1978] Forty years after this …

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Ambivalent Futures

On the restitution of objects and white innocence

The legacies of colonialism and imperialism are keeping the European museum scene busy. At first glance, it seems that colonial amnesia is overcome and museums are paving the way for postcolonial restorative justice. A second glance, though, might reveal inconsistencies and shortcomings structuring present museum work. The current debate mainly focuses on objects being looted, exchanged, extorted or bought under colonial rule, and considers the restitution of objects to former …

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Current Developments

Trump’s latest attack on international law

How the nomination of judge Kavanaugh to the supreme court could shape the USA’s approach to international obligations

It seems that US-President Donald Trump has won a powerful supporter for his onslaught on international law and international institutions: Supreme Court Judge nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The nomination of judge Brett Kavanaugh by Donald Trump as successor for the departing judge Kennedy has understandingly only received mediocre attention in European media and within the public law community whereas this issue seems to prevail debates in recent weeks amongst US scholars and large …

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Property and Possession

Some considerations on the history of ideas relating to a pair of legal concepts

In his preface to the German dictionary Deutsches Wörterbuch, Jacob Grimm calls the German legal language of his time “unhealthy and feeble, much overloaded with Roman terminology” (Dt. WBVorrede, XXXI). In contrast, he praises the graphic clarity of early German legal writing, which had already been the subject of his wonderful treatise “About Poetry in Law” (1816). It says (in the consistently lower case writing which he favoured): “german laws …

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Eigentum und Besitz

Ein paar ideengeschichtliche Gedanken zu einem juristischen Begriffspaar

In der Vorrede zum Deutschen Wörterbuch nennt Jacob Grimm die deutsche Rechtssprache seiner Zeit „ungesund und saftlos, mit römischer terminologie hart überladen“ (Dt. WBVorrede, XXXI). Er lobt dagegen die griffige Anschaulichkeit altdeutscher Gesetzestexte, die er bereits als junger Mann in seiner wunderbaren Abhandlung Von der Poesie im Recht (1816) zum Forschungsgegenstand gemacht hatte. Darin heißt es – Grimm war ein Vertreter der konsequenten Kleinschreibung : „die deutschen gesetze enthalten eine menge …

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Cultural Heritage in a Post-Colonial WorldSymposium

Dekoloniale Perspektiven zu Berlins Humboldt Forum

Positionen und Kritik von Dekolonisierungsaktivist*innen

Jährlich demonstrieren Afrikaner*innen aus ehemaligen (deutschen) Kolonien sowie People of Colour (PoC) und Schwarze diasporische bzw. migrantische Communities für die Anerkennung kolonialen Unrechts und die Rückgabe von Gebeinen und Kultursubjekten,[1] die im Zuge des Kolonialismus nach Deutschland gebracht wurden. Die öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit für koloniales Unrecht und die Rückgabe von Gebeinen und Kultursubjekten war bisher begrenzt, bekommt nun aber durch ein ca. 600 Millionen Euro schweres Projekt neuen Auftrieb: Derzeit wird …

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