Current DevelopmentsResponse

A Response to “A Financial Crisis or Something More?”

In a post of 13 June to this blog, the authors addressed the financial crisis of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, characterized it as a result of state dissatisfaction, and portrayed it as an opportunity to reimagine the role of member states and the organs of the Inter-American Human Rights System (the Commission and the Court). I agree with the authors that the financial crisis goes beyond the issue …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

Africa’s Absence in the Megaregionals

Something to worry about or much ado about nothing?

Global international economic relations have been constantly evolving since the 1994 institutionalization of the GATT. The majority of African countries signed into the World Trade Organization in 1994, whether because of a desire to join the multilateral trading system, or as a condition of loans from the IMF and World Bank during the heyday of the Washington Consensus.  The multilateral trading system has been quite efficient in mitigating the hitherto …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

An Indian perspective on megaregionals and concomitant trends

I am grateful for the opportunity to participate in this symposium and would like to congratulate the MegaReg team on their efforts to draw attention to a fascinating series of developments in international law, and the authors of the working papers on providing thoughtful commentaries to form the basis of these analyses. In their papers, Professors Eyal Benvenisti and Richard B. Stewart draw out some common themes relating to the …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

Megaregionals and the Others

Our symposium accompanying the ICONS conference in Berlin

This weekend, public and international lawyers gather at Humboldt University in Berlin for the third conference of the International Society of Public Law, entitled “Borders, Otherness, and Public Law”. Völkerrechtsblog takes up one particularly salient issue that is covered in panels and papers at the conference, but that is also a concern for international and public lawyers worldwide: The future structure of international economic law, and more specifically, the rise of megaregional trade deals like TTIP …

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Current Developments

A Financial Crisis or Something More?

A turning point for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

On May 23, 2016, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) published a press release giving notice of an immediate financial crisis leading to the “suspension of hearings and imminent layoff of nearly half its staff.” The IACHR asserted that this situation arose as a result of the Organization of American States (OAS) member states’ failure to support the fulfilment of the Commission’s mandate. The IACHR’s budget deficit is, nevertheless, …

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DiscussionResponse

A Response to “Is the Islamic State a State?”

Ralph asks “Is the Islamic State a State?” and his answer has three strings: First, he presents what he calls the advocatus diaboli opinion that all statehood requirements (territory, population, government) are fulfilled. Second, he explains the meaning of recognition as a requirement for the formation of a state. And third, he sets forth the legitimacy argument by concluding that because of the lack of the rule of law, the …

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DiscussionKick-off

Is the Islamic State a State?

The so-called Islamic State has triggered a wave of commentary ever since it emerged as one of the leading military groups in Syria and further captured vast parts of Iraqi territory in mid-2014. What seems to have received only little attention this far is its legal characterization.

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DiscussionResponse

A Response to “Which Rights to enforce in Time of Public Emergency?”

A response to Cilem Şimşek The interplay between human rights law (HRL) and international humanitarian law (IHL) is one of the most difficult and fascinating topics of international law. The blog by Cilem Şimşek  attempts to put in perspective the evolution of this interplay with a focus on the practice of the European Court of Human Rights. Three key themes are developed. Each of them gives rise to diverging interpretations as …

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DiscussionKick-off

Which Rights to enforce in Time of Public Emergency?

The European Court of Human Right’s approach towards International Humanitarian Law

The present post examines the relationship between human rights law (“HRL”) and international humanitarian law (“IHL”). This relationship will be first analysed from a legal-dogmatic angle, and then in the light of the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights (“the Court”)”. By focussing solely on the right to derogate from the European Convention on Human Rights pursuant to Article 15, this post will show that the Court’s approach …

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DiscussionResponse

Thinking globally, acting globally

The case of corporate criminal liability and economic crimes

As stated in Ricarda’s post, the African Union surprised the international community in 2014 with its proposal for the creation of an integrated African Court of Justice and Human Rights (ACJHR) drafted in the Malabo Protocol. The planned criminal law chamber stirs academics as much as practitioners because of its not yet defined relationship to the International Criminal Court (ICC). The new chambers could either be upstream or equally ranked with …

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DiscussionKick-off

Thinking globally, acting regionally

Towards the regionalization of international criminal law

In June 2014, the African Union (AU) General Assembly adopted the Malabo Protocol that attempts to change the AU court system as well as international criminal law (ICL) in a radical – yes, even revolutionary way. The Protocol foresees the creation of an integrated African Court of Justice and Human Rights featuring a human rights chamber, a general affairs chamber and a criminal law chamber that has jurisdiction over natural …

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Current Developments

Europäischer Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte: Türkei diskriminiert 20 Millionen Aleviten

  Der Europäische Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte hat in seinem jüngsten Urteil İzzettin Doğan und andere gegen die Türkei (Urt. v. 26. April 2016, Beschwerde-Nr. 62649/10) die Finanzierung und Organisation des religiösen Lebens von Aleviten in der Türkei untersucht und festgestellt, dass der Konventionsstaat im Umgang mit dem Alevitentum gegen die Religionsfreiheit gemäß Art. 9 EMRK und das Diskriminierungsverbot gemäß Art. 14 EMRK verstößt.

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Interview

„Who among us gets to be global?“

An Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

Atossa Araxia Abrahamian wrote a book entitled „The Cosmopolites“, which speaks about global citizenship in a way that is deeply informed by the theoretical discussion but at the same time rich in concrete stories. These involve stories about stateless persons, for whom their state of residence decided to buy citizenship of another state, stories about the merchandising of passports for a global elite, and stories of a man who decided …

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DiscussionResponse

Die Besonderheit der Bodenschätze

Eine Erwiderung auf Markus Krajewski

Dieser Beitrag erwidert auf den Post von Markus Krajewski im Rahmen unserer Journal-Kooperation mit der “Verfassung und Recht in Übersee“. Ich freue mich, dass mir die Redaktion des Völkerrechtsblogs die Gelegenheit gibt, hier meine aktuelle Forschung zur Diskussion zu stellen. Die Krüger-Vorlesung von 2014, die Markus Krajewski kommentiert, ist ein kleiner Ausschnitt aus einem größeren Projekt zum transnationalen Rohstoffrecht.

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DiscussionKick-off

Menschenrechte als Antwort auf Verteilungsfragen im transnationalen Rohstoffrecht

Dieser Beitrag setzt unsere Journal-Kooperation mit der “Verfassung und Recht in Übersee” fort und diskutiert einen Aufsatz von Isabel Feichtner zum internationalen Rohstoffrecht, der in der nächsten Ausgabe der VRÜ erscheint. Isabel Feichtner lenkt unseren Blick auf Rechtsfragen der internationalen Rohstoffwirtschaft, die in den letzten Jahrzehnten nicht im Mittelpunkt der Völkerrechtswissenschaft standen, obwohl gerade auch in jüngerer Zeit vermehrt entsprechende politische und rechtssetzende Aktivitäten zu beobachten sind. Exemplarisch lässt sich …

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DiscussionResponse

Climate Change and the Arctic as a Common Concern

A response to Birgit Peters. In her blog post Birgit Peters reflects on “recent rules and approaches” for protecting the Arctic region in a time of intense climatic changes. Peters emphasizes what she understands as a shift from traditional regulatory approaches that frame the Arctic as a common heritage and common concern, focused on prohibition, to an integrated approach focusing on sustainability. Peters in this respect discusses the role of …

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