DiscussionKick-off

Globale Koine Eirene?

Der antike Ursprung der Vereinten Nationen

Die UN und das Prinzip der kollektiven Sicherheit sind aus der heutigen Weltpolitik nicht mehr wegzudenken. Doch was kaum jemand weiß: ähnliche multilaterale Friedensverträge gab es schon in der griechischen Antike. Dort wurden sie Koine Eirene (griech.: Allgemeiner Frieden) oder Amphiktyonie genannt. Ist unser heutiges globales Friedenssystem nur eine Kopie der Antike? Welche Probleme ergeben sich daraus für die Universalität der Globalordnung? Im Jahre 2015 feierten wir 70 Jahre Vereinte …

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Current Developments

German Genocide in Namibia before U.S. Courts

Ovaherero and Nama sue Germany over Colonial Injustices – Again

Since October 2016, the German Historical Museum has been dealing with the past and presence of German colonialism in a special exhibition (see here) – for the first time ever. But German colonialism is not only a dusty artefact exposed in some German museum. Instead, it continues to haunt the German State in the form of claims for reparations by the descendants of the victims of colonial injustices. While German …

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Current Developments

Retter der Menschenrechte weltweit?

Zur Verabschiedung des Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act in den USA

Ob Folter durch Sicherheitskräfte, Gefängnisstrafen ohne faires Gerichtsurteil oder Ausbeutung durch korrupte Beamte: Menschenrechte werden weltweit täglich verletzt, wie auch für das Jahr 2016 dem Jahresbericht von Human Rights Watch zu entnehmen ist. Oft erwarten die Täter keine Strafen, sei dies weil es in ihrem Land kein funktionierendes Justizsystem gibt oder weil sie sich durch Bestechung oder Flucht einer gerechten Strafe entziehen. Kein Wunder, dass Verfechter der Menschenrechte zuweilen die …

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Discussion

Vereint gegen den Terror?

Die Anwendung der europäischen Bündnisklausel nach den Pariser Anschlägen

Der 13. November 2015 begann in Paris wie ein ganz normaler Tag und endete in Blut und Schrecken: sechs Anschläge erschüttern die französische Hauptstadt, 130 Menschen verloren ihr Leben, über 350 wurden zum Teil schwer verletzt.  Die Terrororganisation „Islamischer Staat“ bekannte sich zu den Anschlägen und Europa war angesichts des islamistischen Terrors einmal mehr fassungslos. Stand Frankreich auf dem Kontinent dieser Gefahr alleine gegenüber? Nein, sagte der französische Präsident Hollande …

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DiscussionResponse

Victor’s Justice, Contested

A Response to Gabriel Lentner

In his post, Gabriel Lentner argues that the ICC legitimizes and reproduces “victor’s justice” through its acceptance of Article 13(b) referrals from the Security Council. He takes issue with the legal nature of the referrals, in which he finds the legitimation of a double standard of international justice in the Rome Statute. He also sees a double standard in the referrals themselves. That is, the referrals under Article 13(b) are …

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DiscussionKick-off

Victor’s Justice in Disguise?

UN Security Council Referrals and the International Criminal Court

The UN Security Council has the power to refer situations to the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the will of the territorial state, even if that state is not a party to the ICC. The Council has done so for the first time in 2005 in the case of the atrocities committed in the brutal civil war in Darfur, Sudan. That referral resulted inter alia in two open arrest warrants …

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Forum

Open Access on the shores of international legal scholarship

Völkerrechtsblog’s experience with providing open access to scholars from 156 countries around the world

The digital revolution is hitting the shores of academic publishing. Online resources increasingly gain ground, and open access has become the call of the day – and a hotly debated issue. Political and academic initiatives favor and fund open access, for instance the digital strategy of the German Ministry of Education and Research or the Open Access 2020 initiative of the Max Planck society. For its advocates, open access promises …

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Digital surveillance and cyber espionageSymposium

Unilateralism ahead?

Human rights, digital surveillance and the “extraterritorial question” in international law

Here we are. It could seem a bit obvious to start with this overwhelming event, but it is truly important to stress that the recent results of the US elections will have far reaching consequences in many fields of international law, including the one that this post is dealing with: the yet unsettled complex set of issues of extraterritoriality with respect to surveillance practices. Indeed, one of the foreseeable developments …

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Digital surveillance and cyber espionageSymposium

Der Schutz der Menschenrechte im Cyberspace durch die EMRK

Aktuelle Beschwerden beim EGMR im Hinblick auf staatliche Überwachung

Der EGMR hat im Laufe seiner Rechtsprechung die „offline“ Gewährleistungen aus dem Recht auf Achtung des Privat- und Familienlebens aus Art. 8 EMRK und dem Recht auf freie Meinungsäußerung aus Art. 10 EMRK auf die neuen Verhaltensweisen im Cyberspace übertragen. Schon seit dem Urteil Klass gg. Deutschland aus dem Jahr 1978 hat er die Verpflichtung der Mitgliedstaaten zur organisatorischen und verfahrensrechtlichen Sicherung der Privatsphäre und der Einrichtung von geeigneten und …

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Digital surveillance and cyber espionageSymposium

The surveillance you have paid for

Cybersecurity and the Internet of Things

Have you ever paid for surveillance measures? Not indirectly through taxes, rather directly? And have you ever installed the measures in your home? If you think that this is an absurd question, do read this blog post. It relates to four trends I would like to point out to you: the constant development of the internet of things (IoT) adds a whole new dimension to the problem of surveillance (1.). …

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Digital surveillance and cyber espionageSymposium

The dark side of digitalization

It is difficult to imagine today’s world without digitalization. We are shopping online, write messages to our friends on WhatsApp, let the world know what we think about a newly elected political leader on Twitter, post a picture of our morning breakfast on Instagram and attend an online-course in “Creative Writing” in the evening. In addition, applications of the “internet of things” silently work around us without us even noticing: …

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DiscussionLaw and LiteratureResponse

Towards a more radical deterritorialisation of language

The Case for Esperanto

A reply to Ekaterina Yahyahoui It is hard to imagine an ‘intensive usage’ of language being accommodated within international law. How would international treaty-making incorporate use of syntax ‘in order to cry, to give a syntax to the cry’? How would the judges of the ICJ treat counsel addressing them in language that is not intended to convey content, but rather to allow ‘a direct and immediate access to emotion’? …

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Kick-offLaw and Literature

Expression over Content

An examination of the language of international law

In this short piece I will argue that international law, in order to gain access to its revolutionary potential, needs to create a new linguistic opening. This linguistic opening needs to be located within the expression as opposed to content of international law. In this sense this piece is not situated on the continuum of the existing international law and literature studies. It also develops an argument different from widely …

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Movement of PeopleSymposium

Latin-America and Refugees: a panoramic view

Latin America is a peculiar region in relation to protection through asylum. On the one hand, it has a long-lasting and still operating tradition of political asylum that coexists with an expanded recognition of refugee status based both on the 1951 Convention on Refugees and its 1967 Protocol and the Cartagena Declaration (a regional 1984 document that states that a person can be a refugee if s/he is fleeing gross …

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Movement of PeopleSymposium

Flexible Solidarity – Effective Solidarity?

While the Member States of the European Union are still divided about both their migration policies and politics, in particular about taking in (which number and which kind of) refugees, the so-called Visegrad Group or “V4 Countries” (Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary) has/have proposed “flexible solidarity” as a new tool to handle the crisis and feasible alternative to resettlement and mandatory quotas. “Flexible solidarity”, they argue, “should enable …

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Movement of PeopleSymposium

The Arab Refugee Paradox

An overview of refugee legislations in the Arab Middle East

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan host some of the largest numbers of refugees in the world. However, among the Arab states, only Egypt and Yemen have signed the Geneva Convention of 1951 on the status of refugees. While nation states in the West have long offered the possibility of full citizenship to immigrants and refugees, it is surprising that the …

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