Current DevelopmentsEvent

Grenzenloses Recht. Dem Völkerrechtshistoriker Jörg Fisch zum 70. Geburtstag

Wie universal kann ein eurozentrisch geprägtes Völkerrecht sein? Und wie lässt sich vermeiden, dass faktische Ungleichheit eine internationale Rechtsordnung sprengt, die seit der Dekolonisierung als Recht zwischen Gleichen ausgestaltet ist? Mit diesen Fragen hat sich der Zürcher Historiker Jörg Fisch schon in seiner 1984 veröffentlichten Bielefelder Habilitationsschrift „Die europäische Expansion und das Völkerrecht“ befasst – einer bahnbrechenden Studie über „die Auseinandersetzungen um den Status der überseeischen Gebiete vom 15. Jahrhundert …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

Why a woman’s presence on the bench is a human rights issue

In order to avoid the danger of an essentialist approach when talking about women’s representation in international courts, the issue should be framed as of of human rights and not merely as one of gender. Although both approaches, the human rights and a more gender-focused feminist one, may have the same goal this is a tricky and crucial distinction to be made. When discussing arguments for women’s presence on the …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

Feminist Judgments in International Law

The Idea of the Feminist Judgments Projects A feminist critique of international courts can confront the lack of representation and inclusion of women as well as women’s lack of access to courts and the justice system. However, any critique of International Courts would be limited without a critical analysis of their output, the all important judgment! Instead of performing the usual academic critique of where the judgment was lacking in …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

Feminism and the International Criminal Court – still an issue?

While the International Criminal Court (ICC) has always been subject to criticism and is maybe currently facing its biggest crisis with member states withdrawing, the things that are actually going quite well must not be forgotten. It is time to reexamine the ICC from a different perspective: the feminist one. After the adoption of the Rome Statute (RS) in 1998, many envisioned the Court as almost “feminist” due to its …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

It’s not about “women’s issues”.

An interview with Nienke Grossman about parity on international court benches

There is no way to get around Nienke Grossman’s work when reflecting about diversity on the benches of international courts. Her scholarship offers statistics about the numbers of women judges, their development over the last years and the respective distribution along nationalities; it examines causes for the exclusion of women, and discusses reasons for claiming a more equal composition of benches. While directly concerned with the representation of women in …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

Symposium: Feminist Critiques of International Courts

In the upcoming days, we are very glad to host a symposium on feminist critiques of international courts. Where to begin when introducing this topic? There is much to say about the particular role of (international) courts for international law, and equally much about the role of feminist perspectives for international law. Courts are not just institutions, in which a decision is rendered about the interpretation of law in a …

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Current DevelopmentsDiscussionKick-off

Iran’s Ballistic Missile Tests

Legal and Political Challenges

Little over a week after the inauguration of Donald Trump, the new President of the United State (US), the US officials increased international tensions over Iran’s ballistic missile test on January 29, 2017. Shortly after, the UN Security Council scheduled urgent consultations on 31st of January over Iran’s failed ballistic missile test at the request of the US. As to the US claims on the violation of the Nuclear Deal, reached …

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Current DevelopmentsDiscussionResponse

Die Büchse der Pandora

Auch bei einem Giftgaseinsatz erlaubt das Völkerrecht aus gutem Grund keine militärische Strafaktion

In der Nacht vom 6. auf den 7. April hat die US-Navy 59 Tomahawk Marschflugkörper  auf den Stützpunkt der syrischen Luftwaffe Shayrat in der Nähe von Homs abgefeuert. Neun syrische Soldaten sind dabei vermutlich getötet worden. Der Angriff soll eine Reaktion auf den vermutlichen Einsatz des Giftgases Sarin durch syrische Streitkräfte in dem Dorf Khan Sheikhun sein. Syrien bestreitet allerdings den Einsatz von chemischen Waffen. Das Echo in der Staatenwelt …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: The Author’s Response

Markus Gunneflo: Writing the History of Columbus Arriving in Haiti

I could not be happier that this book symposium turned out to be a forum for such wide-ranging and critical commentary about targeted killing. All contributors offer nuanced readings of my book while extending the analysis in several significant directions. In appreciation of both these aspects I want to use this opportunity for a brief response to describe the scope of the book – drawing on the contributors reading of …

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Current DevelopmentsDiscussionKick-off

Am Ende des Rechts angelangt – schon wieder

Der mutmaßliche Giftgas-Angriff des Assad-Regimes in Syrien lässt die Vereinigten Staaten zu militärischen Mitteln im nach wie vor andauernden Syrienkonflikt greifen. Der russische Staatspräsident Wladimir Putin hält auch prompt das Vorgehen der Trump-Administration für völkerrechtswidrig. Das Völkerrecht stößt bei der geeigneten Antwort auf diese barbarischen Taten an seine Grenzen. Wo das (Völker-)Recht keine befriedigenden Antworten mehr geben kann, darf jedoch nicht weggeschaut werden. Im Gegensatz zu seinem amerikanischen Amtskollegen gilt …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 5

Jothie Rajah: Targeted Killing and Spectacular War

1. In October 2015, some four and a half years after the Osama bin Laden killing, the New York Times disclosed that weeks before the Abbottabad raid, federal lawyers had engaged in “[s]tretching sparse precedents” to produce “rationales intended to overcome any legal obstacles”. With these disclosures, the apparently extra-legal killing of bin Laden took on a second life as a hyper-legal killing; a killing authorised by precedent and legal …

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DiscussionResponse

Does transnational environmental crime and transnational fisheries crime exist in international law?

Yes, and it is thriving.

In her post, Professor Elliott argues for a ‘levels-of-analysis’ approach to understanding transnational environmental crime. I made a similar argument in a Chapter entitled ‘Fisheries Crime’ in Elliott and Schaedla’s recent book, where I propose three different dimensions to the analysis of ‘fisheries crime’: As a concept in law or the ‘legal procedural perspective’, where ‘fisheries crime’ is an umbrella term for a number of criminal offences, As a criminological phenomenon …

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Current Developments

The use of depleted uranium munition by the US military in Syria – a legally gray area? Not necessarily…

When the US Pentagon confirmed the use and deployment of depleted uranium munition in Syria, an armed conflict having by far exceeded the level of a civil war, on the 16th of February 2017, it did not take long for public outcry to follow. Before dipping into the relevant legal repercussions on the Pentagon’s statement, it is of pivotal importance to answer a fundamental question first: What actually is depleted …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 4

Karin Loevy: Law’s Compulsion or Coming out of the Shadows

On a clear November morning in 2000, Hussein Abayat, a senior official in the Fatah faction Tanzim, was killed by a hellfire anti-tank missile fired from an Israeli helicopter. When the incident was announced later that day, instead of the regular official denial of any direct involvement by Israel in the attack, the Israeli defense minister went on live radio, openly boasting that the IDF did it. I was a …

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Current Developments

CJEU Cases C-157/15 Achbita and C-188/15 Bougnaoui

Does ‘neutrality’ trump religious freedom?

1. Introduction On 14 March 2017 the CJEU upheld the banning of the visible display of any political, philosophical or religious sign in the workplace. As a future consequence, European companies may introduce certain rules to prohibit other religious, political and philosophical symbols. The cases involved two female employees in France and in Belgium, who were dismissed for refusing to remove their headscarves which covered their hair and neck, but …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 3

Nahed Samour: Targeted Killing, Revisiting Hobbes: No Protection, No Obedience

Markus Gunneflo’s book shows how the normalization of targeted killing emerged through extensive legal work. Offering a meticulous account of history and practice, the book highlights the law and politics of protection in the dispute on killing to protect. Hobbes crafted his state sovereignty in Leviathan “with no other design than to set before men’s eyes the mutual relation between protection and obedience”.[1] Targeted killing is a response to the …

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