Rule of Law Goes GlobalSymposium

Does the African Union truly defy the United Nations peace and security regime?

A response to Theresa Reinold In her recent post, Theresa Reinold critically examines the efforts by the African Union to further democracy on the African continent. She pertinently notes that these efforts suffer from an incumbency bias, favoring already established regimes over potential political change, especially in states where no open democratic culture exists. I find her argument by and large convincing and would like to focus on one specific aspect: …

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Rule of Law Goes GlobalSymposium

No unalloyed good

The AU’s rejection of “unconstitutional changes of government”

Democracy and Africa are two words that rarely appear in the same sentence. If they do, the sentences are usually framed in exhortatory or aspirational terms rather than as statements of facts. Yet even though free and fair elections are still far from being the habitual way of obtaining and transferring political power in Africa, the African Union (AU) has developed an impressive array of instruments that seek to nurture …

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Rule of Law Goes GlobalSymposium

Revolution or Regression?

Law and Development after the ‘Rights Revolution’ ‘Law and development’ is all over the place! Indeed, law as development has become a mantra of development discourse deeply entrechened in the programming of the multilateral financial institutions, international development agencies, and civil society organizations, so much so that rule of law promotion has, to an extent, become synonymous with development policy itself. Yet, behind the celebratory chorus of legal scholars-turned-development experts …

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Rule of Law Goes GlobalSymposium

“You can’t be neutral on a moving train”

Conference symposium “Rule of law goes global” “The rule of law maintains things as they are. Therefore, to begin the process of change, to stop a war, to establish justice, it may be necessary to break the law, to commit acts of civil disobedience, as Southern blacks did, as antiwar protesters did”. In his autobiography “You can’t be neutral on a moving train”, American historian and activist Howard Zinn confronts us …

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