DiscussionResponse

Victor’s Justice, Contested

A Response to Gabriel Lentner

In his post, Gabriel Lentner argues that the ICC legitimizes and reproduces “victor’s justice” through its acceptance of Article 13(b) referrals from the Security Council. He takes issue with the legal nature of the referrals, in which he finds the legitimation of a double standard of international justice in the Rome Statute. He also sees a double standard in the referrals themselves. That is, the referrals under Article 13(b) are …

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DiscussionKick-off

Victor’s Justice in Disguise?

UN Security Council Referrals and the International Criminal Court

The UN Security Council has the power to refer situations to the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the will of the territorial state, even if that state is not a party to the ICC. The Council has done so for the first time in 2005 in the case of the atrocities committed in the brutal civil war in Darfur, Sudan. That referral resulted inter alia in two open arrest warrants …

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Interview

Law as a site of politics (Part II)

An interview with Hilary Charlesworth

Völkerrechtsblog is delighted to post the second part of our conversation with Hilary Charlesworth. In this part of the interview she tells us more about the power of rituals and ritualism in human rights law, the role of law in regulation, why interdisciplinary research in law matters, and about her time on the ICJ, where she worked on the Whaling case.

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Photo provided by RegNet
Interview

Law as a site of politics (Part I)

An interview with Hilary Charlesworth

Hilary Charlesworth is best known for her work on feminist theory and international law, however her intellectual curiosity extends far beyond this – for example she recently explored the role of rituals and ritualism in human rights monitoring and in 2011 she was appointed judge ad hoc of the International Court of Justice for the Whaling in the Antarctic case. In 2015 Völkerrechtsblog had the pleasure to meet with Hilary Charlesworth in …

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DiscussionResponse

The Proportionality Critique Still Stands

A Rejoinder to Johann Ruben Leiss Sué González Hauck Johann Ruben Leiss critically remarks that the perception underlying my original post “overburdens proportionality balancing with assumptions and expectations that do not reflect its character”. This rejoinder aims at resolving some apparent misunderstandings about both the object and the thrust of my critique. My aim is to once again highlight the dangers inherent in the overuse of the prevalent concept of …

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DiscussionResponse

Towards an Integrated, Predictable and Coherent International Legal System: A Defence of Proportionality Balancing

A response to Sué González Hauck Johann Ruben Leiss In her post Sué González Hauck provides a thoughtful and critical perspective on proportionality balancing as a means to overcome fragmentation in international law. In my view, however, her perception overburdens proportionality balancing with assumptions and expectations that do not reflect its character. I will first lay out the understanding of proportionality which this comment relies on, before then discussing the arguments …

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DiscussionKick-off

A Critique of Proportionality Balancing as a Harmonization Technique in International Law

Since the publication of the Fragmentation Report by the International Law Commission, international legal scholars and practitioners alike seem to be less concerned about the theoretical questions raised by the fragmentation debate. Instead, they have turned to identifying and examining tools which could avoid or resolve normative conflicts between norms of different specialized areas of international law (also referred to as “regimes”). Proportionality balancing is one of these tools of …

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DiscussionResponse

May it please the Court – A danced pleading

A response to the posts by Miriam Aziz and Mareike Riedel Raphael Schäfer In her latest piece, Miriam Aziz elaborates on the similarities between (international) law and dance, drawing attention to the “perfect line”. After all, every single human discipline is an endless strive for perfection: we see it dominantly in sports, but it can also be seen in the arts. So why should there be no space for this kind …

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SymposiumVerfassungs- und Völkerrecht im Spannungsverhältnis

The Backlash against International Courts

International courts seem to be living in hard times. The International Court of Justice is openly challenged by the Italian Constitutional Court, the European Court of Human Rights faces political initiatives to curtail its power in the UK and in Switzerland, the International Criminal Court is up against occasional rebellion in a number of African countries, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has been confronted with challenges by courts and …

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Future of International LawSymposium

Die Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit löst die Rechtfertigungsprobleme internationaler Rechtsprechung nicht

Eine Replik auf Stephan Schill Internationale Rechtsprechung greift tief in unser Leben ein. Entscheidungen der Welthandelsorganisation zur Subvention grüner Energie, Urteile des Europäischen Menschenrechtsgerichtshofes zum Kruzifix in italienischen Klassenräumen oder womöglich anstehenden Urteile von Investitionsschiedsgerichten zur deutschen Energiewende, sie alle gestalten die Möglichkeiten der individuellen und kollektiven Freiheitsausübung. Internationale Rechtsprechung ist eine Ausübung öffentlicher Gewalt und wie jede öffentliche Gewalt bedarf sie einer demokratischen Legitimation. Diese Sichtweise auf internationale Gerichte—als multifunktionale …

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