DiscussionResponse

The battle against transnational fisheries crime

Jurisdictional challenges

The raison d’être of the concept of transnational ‘fisheries crime’ (TFC) (INTERPOL 2013) or ‘marine resource crime’ (UNODC 2011) can be traced to endemic illicit activities in the fisheries sector which, due to their devastating impacts, are increasingly considered as a serious problem worthy of attention as ‘criminal’ rather than merely ‘illegal’ behaviour. In terms of scope and approach, TFC is a broader and perhaps more ambitious successor of the …

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Current DevelopmentsResponse

Die Umsetzung der schweizerischen Volksinitiative „gegen Masseneinwanderung“

Ein Vergleich mit dem Brexit

Wie es Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral treffend zusammenfasst, hatten die im Vereinigten Königreich ansässigen Völkerrechtler(innen) nach der Brexit-Abstimmung vom 23. Juni 2016 mindestens zwei Gründe zur Erleichterung: erstens die Tatsache, dass sie als Hauptgebiet nicht Europarecht gewählt hatten; zweitens die Gewissheit, dass ihre Expertise in den nächsten Jahren weiterhin gefragt sein würde. Ähnlich erging es wohl ihren Kolleg(inn)en in der Schweiz am Abend des 9. Februars 2014 nach …

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DiscussionResponse

Transnational environmental crime: a challenging problem but not yet a legal concept

A response to Lorraine Elliott Transnational environmental crime is both a challenging reality and a legal concept in the making. From an international law point of view, this concept is currently being defined by soft law instruments that are transmitting normative expectations about the way States may address it rather than prescribing legal provisions. These instruments are paving the way for the future development of international agreements and play an …

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DiscussionResponse

Putschists behind Bars?

Regional Criminalization of Unconstitutional Changes of Government in Africa

This contribution results from our cooperation with the journal „Swiss Review of International and European Law“ an discusses an article by Abdoulaye Soma on the international crime of unconstitutional changes of government, which was published in December 2016. The Point of Departure Regionalism continues to increasingly develop in various fields of law. Abdoulaye Soma, who acknowledges the birth of an African international criminal law, analyses one of its specificities: the …

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DiscussionResponse

Die UNO als Kopie antiker Vorbilder?

Vom Nutzen und Nachteil eines Anachronismus

Kommentar zum Beitrag von Jorrik Fulda In seinem aufschlussreichen Beitrag argumentiert Jorrik Fulda, dass die Vereinten Nationen als System kollektiver Sicherheit dem antiken Modell der Koine Eirene (κοινὴ εἰρήνη) oder Amphiktyonie nachgebildet sind, einem Bündnis griechischer Stadtstaaten, das der Pflege eines gemeinsamen Kultes und der Verteidigung verpflichtet war. Beide seien partikular – und „auf die realpolitische Unterstützung durch einen ambivalenten Hegemon angewiesen“. Fulda geht auf Parallelen und Unterschiede ein, vergleicht …

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DiscussionResponse

Victor’s Justice, Contested

A Response to Gabriel Lentner

In his post, Gabriel Lentner argues that the ICC legitimizes and reproduces “victor’s justice” through its acceptance of Article 13(b) referrals from the Security Council. He takes issue with the legal nature of the referrals, in which he finds the legitimation of a double standard of international justice in the Rome Statute. He also sees a double standard in the referrals themselves. That is, the referrals under Article 13(b) are …

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DiscussionLaw and LiteratureResponse

Towards a more radical deterritorialisation of language

The Case for Esperanto

A reply to Ekaterina Yahyahoui It is hard to imagine an ‘intensive usage’ of language being accommodated within international law. How would international treaty-making incorporate use of syntax ‘in order to cry, to give a syntax to the cry’? How would the judges of the ICJ treat counsel addressing them in language that is not intended to convey content, but rather to allow ‘a direct and immediate access to emotion’? …

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DiscussionResponse

The Role of Human Rights in the Realm of Arms Transfers

The Example of Germany

Elif Askin picked a current, important, and yet rarely discussed issue for her insightful post and offered a compelling perspective on human rights law and arms transfers. By transferring arms to regions where the human rights situation is precarious, Germany risks to contribute to human rights violations, as Elif has highlighted. I will use this opportunity to take up the example of Germany and look at how the human rights situation …

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DiscussionResponse

Understanding the impact of different concepts of surrogate mother for the regulation of international surrogacy arrangements

A response to Sharon Bassan

In her post to this blog, Sharon Bassan advances the argument for a duty on consumers’ states to regulate cross-border surrogacy transactions. The factual background is as follows: intended parents residing in a country with a higher average income, travel to a country with a lower average income, usually in eastern Europe or the global south, to make use of the services of a surrogate mother, and then return to …

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Alternative Dispute ResolutionDiscussionResponseSymposium

Investor-state arbitration: rationale and legitimacy

A reply to Christian Tietje Attempts to conceptualize the foundations of and crucial questions around investment arbitration are most welcome, as the field gains not only public attention, but also increasing importance for investors as well as receivers. Christian Tietje, claiming in the title that investor-state arbitration is a part of the international rule of law and, therefore, a mechanism for upholding it, touches on what may surely be called …

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