Cynical International LawSymposium

Cynicism? Yes, please!

Embracing cynicism at the International Criminal Court

Debates surrounding cynicism in international law have an inherently negative focus. But why not try to take something positive-constructive out of the cynicism an institution is experiencing? Since there are few institutions, which are currently facing more cynical backlash than the International Criminal Court (ICC/Court), this piece will take a look at the reasons and at the question how cynicism manifests itself in the context of the Court and how …

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Cynical International LawSymposium

International law beyond cynicism and critique

A plea for a legal scholarship that offers alternatives instead of reinforcing the status quo

Cynics do not have to look far: critical international law has uncovered the ways in which the forces of colonialism and imperialism have been present in the international legal system from its foundation to the present. According to David Kennedy, it is not only cynical use of law by despots but experts, including legal scholars, that –subtly but surely – enable, reproduce, legalize and legitimize this international legal system. With …

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Cynical International LawSymposium

Cynical International Law?

Announcement of the Online Symposium and Keynote Lecture Livestream

Cynicism and its relation to international law is a question that has so far not comprehensively been studied. Cynicism has been used in a cursory fashion by international lawyers, e.g. when denouncing the invocation of legal justifications by certain actors as ‘cynical’. Others have applied the concept to international lawyers and their attitude towards their own profession. But the concept of cynicism might also be applied to international law itself: …

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Event

Provoking the Single Story

A Report of the MPIL/JHIL-Conference “Politics and the Histories of International Law”

Telling a history of international law is every time a mode of echoing oneself in the present. The danger of a single storyand its oppressive force to identities and peoples that are misrepresented or not represented in it have been stressed in recent years by many scholars, but not only them. It was perhaps most remarkably and famously spelled out by the Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in a TED …

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DiscussionResponse

Taking Trump Seriously

Why international lawyers are at loss in dealing with Trump

In her recent contribution “Trump’s latest attack on international law”, Lena Riemer very accurately points out the threat to international customs and institutions posed by Trump and – currently – by his candidate for the US Supreme Court: Brett Kavanaugh. She demonstrates how Kavanaugh has repeatedly shown disrespect for humanitarian law and human rights in his career as a judge for the Federal Court of Appeals for the District of …

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Call for ContributionsEvent

Conference Announcement and CfP: Cynical International Law?

A joint conference by AjV and DGIR, supported by Völkerrechtsblog

Völkerrechtsblog is proud to announce its support of a joint conference of the Working Group of Young Scholars in Public International Law (Arbeitskreis junger Völkerrechtswissenschaftler*innen – AjV) and the German Society of International Law (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationales Recht – DGIR) on the topic of

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DiscussionResponse

Gibt es noch Hoffnung für überstaatliche Demokratie?

Plädoyer für einen wehrhaften Internationalismus

In seinem Interview auf diesem Blog vertritt Armin von Bogdandy die Position, dass sich die Rahmenbedingungen für überstaatliche Demokratie in den letzten Jahren verschärft hätten. Zwar zeigt er sich überzeugt, dass die überlieferten Prinzipien demokratischen Regierens im Grundsatz auch weiterhin für überstaatliche Ebenen maßgeblich und sinnvoll seien. Es müsse jedoch gelingen, die Entfremdung bestimmter Bevölkerungsteile von überstaatlichen Institutionen zu überwinden und den in vielen Ländern (wieder-)auferstandenen autoritären Nationalismus institutionell einzufangen. …

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Interview

Demokratie und Völkerrecht

Ein Interview mit Armin von Bogdandy

Es wird zur Zeit viel über die Funktionsfähigkeit von Demokratie und über die Effektivität internationalen Rechts gesprochen, aber selten über beides zusammen. Wer wäre besser aufgestellt, um dazu etwas Erhellendes zu sagen, als Armin von Bogdandy, der sich seit vielen Jahren mit den Zusammenhängen von Demokratie und Völkerrecht befasst? Armin von Bogdandy bedarf keiner Vorstellung, wie es so schön heißt, er ist Direktor am Heidelberger Max-Planck-Institut für ausländisches öffentliches Recht …

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Event

It could have been worse

A Historian’s Impression of the Conference “Contingency in International Law: How International law could have been”

Both historians and jurists are intrigued by the future: historians – despite their habitual claims to the contrary – wish to say something meaningful about the future by studying the past, whereas jurists make and render law in order to establish justice, lawfulness, and ultimately peace. Yet, while historians at times reject the “learning from the past” paradigm, fearing an oversimplification of history, the papers presented at the conference on …

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Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Beyond the ‘Moments’ of Law and Development

Law and Development Scholarship in a Globalized Economy

An integral aspect of law and development (L&D) studies have been its intimate relationship with the global economy and the regulatory framework which governs it. A rapidly emerging arena of scholarship on law and development in recent years has been on the intersections between international economic law (IEL) and development. The emergence of this body of scholarship under the broad umbrella of L&D studies has important consequences for law and …

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