DiscussionKick-off

Proportionality assessments under IHL – A human thing?

The employment of drones for targeted killings has triggered a debate on the use of lethal force without direct human presence at the battlefield. Regarding the legal framework for today’s remotely-piloted drone systems, this debate must be considered settled. Their conduct’s legal evaluation depends on the execution of each specific strike. Generally, their employment will only be legal under the law of armed conflict, IHL, and if IHL is complied …

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DiscussionResponse

Is civilian harm tracking a sensible idea?

A response to Ellen Policinski Ellen Policinski makes a persuasive case for the more widespread and systematic employment of civilian harm tracking. Let me tackle the matter from a different angle. The AP I article 57(1) obligation to take constant care would seem, on any sensible interpretation, to imply a requirement to identify what is causing any level of incidental civilian harm, not just excessive civilian harm, during military operations. …

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DiscussionKick-off

Civilian Harm Tracking: An Important Tool During Armed Conflict

Civilian harm is a tragic consequence of armed conflict. Incidental civilian harm – or collateral damage – is prevalent in modern conflicts, which often involve armed groups operating from within the population. Recent examples include operations in Afghanistan, Somalia, Syria, Iraq and the Gaza Strip. The emerging practice of civilian harm tracking is one tool that parties to armed conflict can use to better understand and address this tragic consequence …

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DiscussionResponse

Wie lässt sich die Einhaltung des humanitären Völkerrechts durch bewaffnete Gruppen verbessern?

Eine Replik zum Beitrag von Marco Sassoli. Dass das in bewaffneten Konflikten anwendbare humanitäre Völkerrecht alle Konfliktparteien bindet, einschließlich nicht-staatlicher Akteure, wird nicht bestritten. Allerdings bestehen unterschiedliche Ansätze, diese Bindung nicht-staatlicher Akteure herzuleiten.

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DiscussionKick-off

Völkerrecht von und für nicht-staatliche Handelnde

Das Beispiel des Einsatzes von Geneva Call für die Einhaltung humanitärer Regeln durch bewaffnete Gruppen

Trotz aller modernen Theorien bleibt Völkerrecht besessen vom Phänomen des Staates. Die internationale Wirklichkeit ist hingegen immer mehr (auch) von nicht-staatlichen Handelnden geprägt.

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DiscussionResponse

Pebble in the shoe or elephant in the room?

A Response to the post by Adrian Di Giovanni In his post, Adrian Di Giovanni drew our attention to the notion of Do No Harm, focusing on the context of humanitarian assistance. He observes the increase in relying on or at least mentioning this concept on the international level and rightly asks the question what the meaning could be in a more specific sense. I would like to add to …

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DiscussionKick-off

A Pebble in the Shoe

Assessing International Uses of Do No Harm

My paper published in the last edition of ‘Law and Politics in Asia, Africa and Latin America’ (VRU) is the product of bureaucratic wanderings. Over a number of years, in a meetings on a variety of international topics, I repeatedly heard the same phrase being uttered: “we take a Do No Harm approach.” At first blush, those words had an immediate appeal. Doctors have followed that principle for centuries (primum …

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Future of International LawSymposium

A Future for International Humanitarian Law

Even With Automatic and Autonomous Weapons

A response to Robert Frau The propositions by Robert Frau, which are based on his longstanding research on unmanned combat vehicles and autonomous weaponry, are twofold: It would be a mistake to conclude that in the conduct of military operations there is no longer a place for human actors and considerations of humanity; on the contrary, the decisive role of responsible commanders and individual soldiers can be supported and facilitated, …

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Future of International LawSymposium

Ohne Beine steht sich schlecht

Zur Zukunft des humanitären Völkerrechts

Dass in Teilbereichen des Völkerrechts der Mensch seine zentrale Rolle verlieren soll, haben wir in einem der ersten Blogbeiträge lesen können. Saskia Stucki hat uns beschrieben, wie „für die Zukunft des Völkerrechts zu erwarten sei, dass das gegenwärtige Menschenrechtsparadigma überwunden wird“. Eine ähnliche Tendenz ist im humanitären Völkerrecht zu beobachten. Im Blickpunkt stehen Drohnen und Killer-Roboter; die fortschreitende Automatisierung und Autonomisierung wird, so manche, den Krieg völlig entmenschlichen. Treffen die …

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