Debating "Beyond Human Rights"Symposium

Investors’ Rights Short of Human Rights in a Constitutional Perspective

It will come as no surprise for readers familiar with Anne Peters’ reflections on the international legal system to grasp from her Jenseits der Menschenrechte that also foreign investors are vested with rights rooted in international law (257-307). This phenomenon is linked to a continuous process of internationalisation of legal relationships with host states. But indeed neither the very nature of that process nor that of their rights are well …

READ MORE →

Debating "Beyond Human Rights"Symposium

Beyond Human Rights – Beyond International Law?

There is much to admire in Anne Peters’ book, so much that after reading Jenseits der Menschenrechte, it is difficult to imagine what else can be done in this area of the law. Peters’ book represents the standard treatise in the field for the time being, ably demonstrating chapter by chapter that the individual enjoys direct legal status in international law way beyond human rights.

READ MORE →

Debating "Beyond Human Rights"Symposium

Beyond Human Rights: Beyond a Convertible Vattelian?

Anne Peters’ Beyond Human Rights: The Legal Status of the Individual in International Law is an impressive scholarly intervention, which can be read both as a standalone contribution to the debates about the position of the individual in international law, as well as a companion to Peters’ previous work on global constitutionalism and the constitutionalization of international law.

READ MORE →

Debating "Beyond Human Rights"Symposium

Beyond Human Rights

Our authors debate Anne Peters book on the individual in international law

With the first symposium after our relaunch, Völkerrechtsblog emphasizes its role as a forum for transnational legal debate – a debate that transcends jurisdictions and that connects scholars from different academic communities and parts of the world. We aim to encourage such debates with our new format, the book symposium. We invite authors to discuss important new publications from the German-speaking community in English language to make them accessible to a wider …

READ MORE →

DiscussionResponse

Das Internetgrundrecht zwischen Völkerrecht, Staatsrecht und Europarecht (III)

In Teil I habe ich gezeigt, dass das Völkerrecht den Zugang zum Internet in seinen beiden Dimensionen als Vorbedingung zur Ausübung kommunikativer Rechte schützt. In Teil II habe ich nachgewiesen, dass dem Grundgesetz ein unmittelbarer verfassungsrechtlicher Leistungsanspruch auf Gewährleistung eines menschenwürdigen Existenzminimums zu entnehmen ist. Dieser schützt in der Auslegung des BVerfG ein Recht auf Teilhabe am kommunikativen Leben, das zu den Bedingungen der Informationsgesellschaft nur durch Internetzugang gesichert werden …

READ MORE →

DiscussionResponse

Das Internetgrundrecht zwischen Völkerrecht, Staatsrecht und Europarecht (II)

In Teil I habe ich gezeigt, dass das Völkerrecht den Internetzugang in beiden Dimensionen – Zugang zum Internet (Infrastrukturdimension) und Zugang zu Internetinhalten (Inhaltsdimension) – schützt. Ein Recht auf Internetzugang (oder kürzer: ein Recht auf Internet) ist Vorbedingung der Realisierung aller anderen Menschenrechte über das Internet. Es setzt jedoch zumindest eine grundlegende staatlich garantierte Kommunikationsinfrastruktur voraus. Nationales Verfassungsrecht, Völkerrecht und auch Europarecht spielen hier ineinander.

READ MORE →

DiscussionKick-off

Das Internetgrundrecht zwischen Völkerrecht, Staatsrecht und Europarecht (I)

Die aktuellen Entwicklungen um die wachsende Anzahl von Flüchtlingen in Europa führen Debatten in nicht erwartete Richtungen. So dynamisiert die Frage, inwieweit Flüchtlingsunterkünfte mit WLAN, womöglich ‚Freifunk‘, ausgestattet werden können, die Diskussion um das Recht auf Internetzugang. Natürlich muss der Staat nicht jedem Flüchtling ein Smartphone zur Verfügung stellen. Das lässt aber das Grundrecht auf Internetzugang unberührt. Teil I des Beitrages widmet sich der völkerrechtlichen Begründung dieses Rechts, Teil II …

READ MORE →

Practitioner's Corner

Practitioner’s Corner: MONUSCO – an inside view into a peacekeeping mission

The “Practitioner’s Corner” gives the floor to practicing international lawyers. Their accounts illustrate the diversity of work within the field of international law and offer personal insights into the practice of international law. If it’s not written down, it does not exist In those words, I can sum up what I’ve learned over the past two years working for the UN. It also perfectly captures the basics of working in the …

READ MORE →

DiscussionResponse

Towards an Integrated, Predictable and Coherent International Legal System

A Defence of Proportionality Balancing

A response to Sué González Hauck In her post Sué González Hauck provides a thoughtful and critical perspective on proportionality balancing as a means to overcome fragmentation in international law. In my view, however, her perception overburdens proportionality balancing with assumptions and expectations that do not reflect its character. I will first lay out the understanding of proportionality which this comment relies on, before then discussing the arguments brought forth by …

READ MORE →

DiscussionKick-off

A Critique of Proportionality Balancing as a Harmonization Technique in International Law

Since the publication of the Fragmentation Report by the International Law Commission, international legal scholars and practitioners alike seem to be less concerned about the theoretical questions raised by the fragmentation debate. Instead, they have turned to identifying and examining tools which could avoid or resolve normative conflicts between norms of different specialized areas of international law (also referred to as “regimes”). Proportionality balancing is one of these tools of …

READ MORE →