Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Reflections on the history and future of Law and Development

Recording of David Trubek’s Keynote Lecture at the LDRN Conference

Watch here the recording of  the Keynote Lecture of David Trubek (University of Wisconsin-Madison) who reflects upon the history and future of Law and Development and its main current challenges, as part of his keynote at the LDRN Conference at Humboldt University Berlin on 27 September 2019. The keynote is followed by a roundtable discussion with Celine Tan (University of Warwick), Morag Goodwin (Tilburg University), Johanna Cortes (University of Rosario), …

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Social justice – a vehicle for transformative constitutionalism

Recording of Justice Madan Lokur’s Keynote Lecture at the LDRN Conference

Watch here the recording of the Keynote of Justice Madan Lokur (Supreme Court of India) who explains the challenges and opportunities of transformative constitutionalism as a vehicle for social justice, held at the LDRN Conference at Humboldt University Berlin on 26 September 2019.     If your browser does not support the video format, you can watch the keynote here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2P6CYO-VzuE&t=10s

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Towards comparative legal institutionalism

Recording of Katharina Pistor’s Keynote Lecture at the LDRN Conference

Watch here the Keynote Lecture of Katharina Pistor (Columbia Law School) reflecting on questions of method and theory through her approach of “comparative legal institutionalism”, opening the LDRN Conference at Humboldt University Berlin on 25 September 2019. The Keynote is followed by a comment by Prof. David Trubek (University of Wisconsin-Madison). If your browser does not support the video format, you can watch the keynote here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caJ63vDbbUY&t=20s

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Alternatives to Development in the Andes

Contesting cosmovisions and their path towards recognition

The concept of “development” has become a buzzword for social change, economic redistribution and ultimately socio-economic rights. This concerns both economic relations maintained in the international community built on the premise of State sovereignty and resulting intergovernmental agreements. Manifestations of such realities are manifold including a dominating WTO-steered legal order; new international trade deals such as current EU-Mercosur negotiations on the most extensive free trade zone on earth; the CETA …

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Scholars in mutual estrangement?

Transformative constitutionalism meets law and development

There is a curious estrangement between two scholarly communities that ought to have a lot in common: The first studies “transformative constitutionalism”, the second “law and development”. There is considerable thematic, geographical and methodological overlap between the two. Yet, the two strands of scholarship do not systematically connect. My argument in this post is that connecting the two approaches is productive because it confronts each side with its own blind …

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Increasing the benefits, reducing the costs

Adding competitiveness to the theory and practice of free trade agreements and regional integration in Africa

With an increase in the spread and impact of independent regulatory agencies, Africa now has a nascent but significant network of competition authorities and other economic regulators.  This growth in African regulatory practice and influence contributes to the value of adding the factor of competitiveness to the theory and practice of African regional integration.  To add competitiveness may well increase the total benefits and speed of these developments of multinational …

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Plurality of Law and DevelopmentSymposium

The plurality of law and development

Reflections on a field in transformation

As a legal field, law and development is often traced back to the movement of US-American scholars and practitioners in the 1960s and 1970s, both epitomized and criticized by David Trubek’s seminal article “Scholars in Self-Estrangement”. While this strand remains an important reference, the story of law and development is arguably broader, more plural and more global. The plurality of law and development is marked by a variety of national …

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Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Beyond the ‘Moments’ of Law and Development

Law and Development Scholarship in a Globalized Economy

An integral aspect of law and development (L&D) studies have been its intimate relationship with the global economy and the regulatory framework which governs it. A rapidly emerging arena of scholarship on law and development in recent years has been on the intersections between international economic law (IEL) and development. The emergence of this body of scholarship under the broad umbrella of L&D studies has important consequences for law and …

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Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Beyond a fourth moment in law and development

A plea for heterodoxy

In the wake of the decolonization wave after World War II, a law and development (L&D) practice and academic strand emerged. So far, scholarship on law and development that self-identifies as L&D has been predominantly economic in orientation. It has never moved beyond a market-friendly or market-centered approach. This tradition has also adopted a fairly naïve instrumentalist approach to law. I submit that scholars who are more concerned with the …

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Law and DevelopmentSymposium

Law and Development: Theory and Practice

The field of Law and Development studies positions itself at a highly interesting, yet academically challenging juncture: What is the relationship between law and social and economic development? For most scholars of Law and Development, this question itself tends to raise more questions than answers: What conceptions of law are we actually talking about? And should the notion of ‘development’ be critically re-appropriated beyond modernized ideals of economic growth? Or …

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