Allegra - Transitional Justice

The limits of truth telling

Victim-centrism in Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian residential schools

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. Truth commissions can be seen, not only as venues for addressing the worst abuses of states in a search for justice, but as institutions that produce knowledge, oriented toward shaping opinion on …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Judicial means and political ends: transitional justice and political trials

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. There are fascinating parallels and connections between political trials and transitional justice. Both are seen to serve other ends than merely punishing individuals who committed a crime. Often they serve to legitimize …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

In the name of ‘rule of law’

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. After South Sudan declared its independence from the Republic of the Sudan in 2011, one could read in the international media scene: “South Sudan fights to implement Rule of Law […] At …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Reimagining Transitional Justice in Bali

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. “It’s already the era of demokrasi, you know,” Pak Ketut says, nodding his head in firm approval, stretching out each syllable of the Indonesianized English as if savoring a potent taste. As …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Rescuing (cosmopolitan) locals at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. On the 31st December 2014, after twenty years of existence, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) finally ceased operations. Established in November 1994 by the United Nations Security Council, the ICTR …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Labors of memory and the post-conflict economy

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. During my research on Sierra Leone’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) 2003, a group of men in Lunsar invited me to a palm wine bar to hear their views. They were especially …

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SymposiumVerfassungs- und Völkerrecht im Spannungsverhältnis

At a crossroads

Russia and the ECHR in the aftermath of Markin

As part of Verfassungsblog’s topical focus on the prevailing tensions between international and national constitutional law, we go east and take a look at Russia and its unsteady relationship with the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR) – particularly the lately arisen tensions between the Russian Constitutional Court (CCR) and Strasbourg in the wake of the ECtHR’s decision in the Markin case. First, and in a more general manner, we …

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Histories of International LawSymposium

Histories on EJIL Talk!

The first three contributions from our series “Histories of International Law” are now available in English on EJIL Talk!: “Völkerrechtsgeschichten” by Alexandra Kemmerer, “German International Law Scholarship and the Postcolonial Turn” by Jochen von Bernstorff, and Marcus Payk’s response “The History of International Law – or International Law in History?“.

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Histories of International LawSymposium

Was ist Wahrheit?

(K)ein Schlusswort zum Symposium „Völkerrechtsgeschichten”

„Wir müssen sprechen! Als Historikerin geht es Ihnen um die Wahrheit, und da sollten Sie meine Version der Geschichte hören!” – „Sehr gern. Aber Sie sollten wissen: Ich arbeite zwar an einer intellektuellen Biographie, Historikerin bin ich aber nicht. Und um ‚die Wahrheit’ geht es mir auch nicht.” Am Tag nach Weihnachten habe ich den Gesellschaftsrechtler, dessen Karriere von einem einflussreichen Europarechtler geprägt wurde, dann auf einen Kaffee getroffen. Er …

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Histories of International LawSymposium

Die Interdependenz von Völkerrechtswissenschaft und Historiographie

Eine Replik auf die Beiträge von Alexandra Kemmerer, Jochen von Bernstorff und Markus M. Payk Die vorzüglichen Beiträge zur Völkerrechtshistorie sind zu begrüßen, folgende ergänzende Anmerkungen können jedoch hilfreich sein.

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