Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

Megaregionals and the Others — A Rejoinder

We thank the Völkerrechtsblog for hosting this symposium and are immensely grateful to Abhimanyu George Jain and Azwi Langalanga for offering their insightful views. We take this opportunity to reply to both posts and to reflect on some further themes coming out of the ICON-S 2016 panels that dealt with the megaregionals. The discussions around TTIP and TPP often focus on the agreements purported domestic effects and neglect the megaregionals’ …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

Africa’s Absence in the Megaregionals

Something to worry about or much ado about nothing?

Global international economic relations have been constantly evolving since the 1994 institutionalization of the GATT. The majority of African countries signed into the World Trade Organization in 1994, whether because of a desire to join the multilateral trading system, or as a condition of loans from the IMF and World Bank during the heyday of the Washington Consensus.  The multilateral trading system has been quite efficient in mitigating the hitherto …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

An Indian perspective on megaregionals and concomitant trends

I am grateful for the opportunity to participate in this symposium and would like to congratulate the MegaReg team on their efforts to draw attention to a fascinating series of developments in international law, and the authors of the working papers on providing thoughtful commentaries to form the basis of these analyses. In their papers, Professors Eyal Benvenisti and Richard B. Stewart draw out some common themes relating to the …

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Megaregionals and the OthersSymposium

Megaregionals and the Others

Our symposium accompanying the ICONS conference in Berlin

This weekend, public and international lawyers gather at Humboldt University in Berlin for the third conference of the International Society of Public Law, entitled “Borders, Otherness, and Public Law”. Völkerrechtsblog takes up one particularly salient issue that is covered in panels and papers at the conference, but that is also a concern for international and public lawyers worldwide: The future structure of international economic law, and more specifically, the rise of megaregional trade deals like TTIP …

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