Discussion

Combatting the legal side effects of privatized war

What has been achieved, and what still needs to be done in international legal scholarship on Private Military and Security Companies

This contribution continues our journal cooperation with the journal “Swiss Review of International & European Law“. Over the past twenty years a lively debate on the regulation of private military and security companies (PMSCs) in situations of armed conflict has developed. The time has come for an appraisal of the rich literature on the phenomenon. This post which is written in the context of the journal cooperation with the Swiss …

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Current DevelopmentsDiscussionResponse

The Referendum on Catalan Self-Determination: Long Shots and Legal Flair

The image conjured by the first subtitle of Zoran Oklopcic’s post on the referendum on Catalan self-determination, that of a zombie self-determination resurrected from its post-Kosovan resting place and back to haunt international legal rhetoric perfectly captures the mood amongst many in the international community who had perhaps been hoping that the rhetoric of self-determination had all but given up the ghost. As Oklopcic underlines, the past 15 years have …

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The Referendum on Catalan Self-Determination (Part II)

Endemic Rhetoric, Interpretive Hypocrisy and Legal Imagination

Constitutionalizing Secession in Canada and Britain: Setting a(n) (bad) example? What encouraged the Catalans to place their bets on the persuasive power of remedial self-determination were two constitutional, not international legal texts: the Supreme Court of Canada’s 1998 Reference re Secession of Quebec, and the 2013 Edinburgh Agreement between the British and the Scottish governments on the referendum of the independence of Scotland. Though neither offered support to the Catalan …

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The Referendum on Catalan Self-Determination (Part I)

Endemic Rhetoric, Interpretive Hypocrisy and Legal Imagination

Dawn of the Living Dead? Self-Determination in (Southern) Europe, 1991 – 2017 Scheduled to take place on 1 October 2017, the referendum on the independence of Catalonia looks to be a turning point in the history of the Iberian peninsula; if not a point of no return, then at least the moment after which the relationship between Catalonia and Spain will never again be the same. Though it is hard …

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Discussion

Is a bird in the hand always worth two in the bush?

An assessment of the EU’s New Approch Towards the Two-State Solution

This post inaugurates a new cooperation of Völkerrechtsblog with the “Leiden Journal of International Law“. Firmly established as one of the leading journals in the field, the Leiden Journal of International Law (LJIL) provides a venue for sharp and critical voices that speak on the theory and practice of international law. It aspires to introduce or amplify refreshing and innovative approaches to perennial as well as topical issues in the field. The Journal’s focus …

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On ‘cyber trafficking’ and the protection of its victims

‘Cyber trafficking’ has become a buzzword in scientific and policy discussions related to human trafficking. However, as has been noted elsewhere, the term is far from being used in a uniform way. In her recent post, Sabine Witting discusses the case of trafficking that is exclusively committed online. In my view, ‘cyber trafficking’ is a much more wide-spread phenomenon than what her article seems to imply, occurring within many cases …

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‘Cyber’ Trafficking? An Interpretation of the Palermo Protocol in the Digital Era

The digital era has changed the traditional realm and modus operandi of organised crime, such as human trafficking. With the increasing access to and usage of the internet, major criminal activity has expanded to the online sphere. Law enforcement around the world is however largely not prepared for combatting cybercrime. Many states have not yet reached the capacity of drafting cyber specific legislation. In Africa for example, only 11 states …

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The role of the ICC and of non-State actors concerning the protection of cultural heritage

International cultural heritage law is a vast and complex field of research which involves many actors, as the previous contribution by Adrianna Michel shows. In response, we would like to give a couple of thoughts on two of the issues raised by the author: the role of the International Criminal Court (ICC), and the role of non-States actors. Regarding the ICC, the condemnation of Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi for …

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Kulturgüterschutz – eine Verpflichtung gegenüber der uns nachfolgenden Generation

Die heutigen Formen der Bedrohung von Kulturgütern sind vielschichtig. Neben der Zerstörung in bewaffneten Konflikten oder aus religiösem Wahn spielen auch der Raub und die Verschleppung in und nach kriegerischen Auseinandersetzungen eine wesentliche Rolle. In den letzten Jahren hat sich in tragischer Weise gezeigt, dass islamistische Fundamentalisten immer häufiger mit der Zerstörung von bedeutenden Kulturgütern die Bühne der Weltöffentlichkeit suchen. Die Zerstörungswut richtet sich gezielt gegen die zivilisierte Wertegemeinschaft. Unersetzliche …

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Die Büchse der Pandora

Auch bei einem Giftgaseinsatz erlaubt das Völkerrecht aus gutem Grund keine militärische Strafaktion

Eine Replik auf den Beitrag von Alexander Groß. In der Nacht vom 6. auf den 7. April hat die US-Navy 59 Tomahawk Marschflugkörper  auf den Stützpunkt der syrischen Luftwaffe Shayrat in der Nähe von Homs abgefeuert. Neun syrische Soldaten sind dabei vermutlich getötet worden. Der Angriff soll eine Reaktion auf den vermutlichen Einsatz des Giftgases Sarin durch syrische Streitkräfte in dem Dorf Khan Sheikhun sein. Syrien bestreitet allerdings den Einsatz …

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