BofaxeCurrent Developments

Alle Wege führen nach Dublin

Über die rechtswidrige Rückschiebung eines afghanischen Flüchtlings nach Griechenland

Im Jahr 2018 einigte sich Deutschland mit Griechenland in Form eines Verwaltungsabkommens darauf, dass aus Griechenland über Österreich nach Deutschland einreisende Flüchtlinge unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen unverzüglich nach Athen zurückgeführt werden dürfen. Im Zuge dessen verweigerte die Bundespolizeidirektion einem aus Afghanistan stammenden Flüchtling nach einer Kontrolle die Weiterreise und sorgte für seine Rückführung nach Griechenland, wo er zuerst einen Asylantrag gestellt hatte. Im Rahmen des einstweiligen Rechtsschutzes geht nun das Verwaltungsgericht …

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Current Developments

Poor due to climate impacts

The threat of climate apartheid looms large over the world, says new UN Report

UN special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, Phillip Alston, recently released a report assessing the impact of climate change on human rights, especially the rights of people livingin poverty, who are also the most vulnerable to climatic catastrophes. Poor people are most exposed to climate vulnerability because of where they live, their livelihood activities or lack of resources to cope with climatic shocks. It leaves people in destruction, …

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BofaxeCurrent Developments

Land and identity

On India’s revocation of Jammu & Kashmir’s special constitutional status

“There will be chaos if our identity is compromised”. This statement by Mehbooba Mufti, former Chief Minister of the Indian State of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), shows that the long-simmering conflict over the region (see also Bofax Nr. 517E “Trading Blows”) has once again reached boiling point. Juxtaposing the interplay of land and minority identity in Kashmir with the current ascendancy of land rights in international law, we see that …

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BofaxeCurrent Developments

Between policy and reality

On the challenges of being a refugee in Asia

Since the violent events of August 2017, which triggered one of the most recent mass exoduses of Rohingyas from Rakhine state in Myanmar, the Rohingya diaspora continues to rise. Many are still stranded in Bangladesh, some have managed to risk their lives on boats and journeyed across the seas to reach Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand, while others have attempted to flee to Australia, only to be trapped on Manus Island. …

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Current Developments

Are EU misappropriation sanctions dead?

On 11 July 2019, the EU’s General Court delivered seven analogous judgments in a series of Ukraine-related sanctions cases, including that concerning Ukraine’s ex-president Viktor Yanukovych. Yanukovych is best known for fleeing Ukraine for Russia amidst mass protests in early 2014, leaving behind a private zoo and a mansion with gilded bathrooms. The General Court struck down the EU’s sanctions against Yanukovych and a number of other Ukrainian former public …

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Current Developments

After the trial is before the trial

The ICJ’s Jadhav case and its uncertain domestic implementation

The interplay of international court decisions and their domestic implications is currently challenged in the Kulbhushan Jadhav Case (India v. Pakistan). In this case, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) delivered its verdict on 17 July, 2019. It concerns a 49-year-old former Indian Naval Officer, who was sentenced to death by a Pakistani Military Court on 11 April 2017, on charges of espionage and terrorism. The ICJ ruled against the …

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Current Developments

Finally holding the World Bank accountable?

Analyzing Jam v International Financial Corporation from a TWAIL Perspective

The World Bank (WB), a financial institution born in the Bretton Woods Hotel at the end of the Second World War which enjoys far-reaching immunity due to its status as international organisation, must respond to the US justice system. This was the decision issued on February 27, 2019 by the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) with a wide margin of 7 votes to 1 in the case of …

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Current Developments

Identifying customary international law from the ivory tower?

Self-defence against non-state actors and why doctrinal precision actually matters

The discussion about the right of self-defence of states against non-state actors is in flux. Among the reasons for that could be new types of terrorism and conflicts which have emerged since the entry into force of the UN Charter. Cross-border impacts and the number of actors involved have increased significantly. These factors, combined with the UN Security Council’s inaction and the increasing threat from terrorist groups, are putting a …

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ABC of OPTBook ReviewSymposium

Response: Critiquing in the Light of The ABC of the OPT

We are grateful to Verfassungblog for dedicating a symposium to The ABC of the OPT; to Anne Peters and Alexandra Kemmerer for their generosity of mind, indeed the contextual mindfulness in which they held a launching event for the book in Berlin (sponsored by both the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law, International Law‘s Berlin Office and Recht im Kontext (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) and wrote the introduction to this symposium; and …

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ABC of OPTBook ReviewSymposium

“Say My Name”: The Politics of Not Naming

At first sight, the “ABC of the OPT” creates the impression that this is yet another book written exclusively by Israeli academics about a situation that has profoundly transformed the framework of occupation law—and international humanitarian law in general—a long time ago. This first impression is underpinned by the use of hegemonically loaded terminology, structure, and choice of entries and sources. Despite the many nuances academics employ to draw a …

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