DiscussionResponse

‘Who may now speak’? International Lawyers and Religious Actors in Transitional Justice

A response to Ioana Cismas What is and what should be the role of faith-based actors in transitional justice (TJ)? Ioana Cismas enquires whether the engagement of TJ with religious actors strengthens or rather undermines the legitimacy and effectiveness of TJ mechanisms and their ability to lead to (at least a measure of) accountability for past abuses. Well, it depends. Ioana Cismas’s answer is nuanced and takes into account the …

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DiscussionKick-off

Religious Actors and Transitional Justice

On Legitimacy and Accountability

A teary-eyed Desmond Tutu during a public hearing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is emblematic for the South African transitional justice (TJ) process to the extent that examining the Commission’s work without recalling the archbishop’s role in its functioning could be considered a scholarly faux-pas. Hence, the question emerges: is this a unique case or are there other Tutus out there? One statistical effort documents the significant involvement of …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

My name is not ‘NN’

Field-notes from an exhumation site in Guatemala City

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. I arrived to La Ciudad Cemetery by the end of February 2014 as part of an introductory training on Forensic Anthropology. In the picture above, the remains in front of me are …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

The limits of truth telling

Victim-centrism in Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian residential schools Ronald Niezen Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. Truth commissions can be seen, not only as venues for addressing the worst abuses of states in a search …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Judicial means and political ends: transitional justice and political trials

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. There are fascinating parallels and connections between political trials and transitional justice. Both are seen to serve other ends than merely punishing individuals who committed a crime. Often they serve to legitimize …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

In the name of ‘rule of law’

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. After South Sudan declared its independence from the Republic of the Sudan in 2011, one could read in the international media scene: “South Sudan fights to implement Rule of Law […] At …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Reimagining Transitional Justice in Bali

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. “It’s already the era of demokrasi, you know,” Pak Ketut says, nodding his head in firm approval, stretching out each syllable of the Indonesianized English as if savoring a potent taste. As …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

Rescuing (cosmopolitan) locals at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. On the 31st December 2014, after twenty years of existence, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) finally ceased operations. Established in November 1994 by the United Nations Security Council, the ICTR …

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