DiscussionResponse

A Response to “Is the Islamic State a State?”

Ralph asks “Is the Islamic State a State?” and his answer has three strings: First, he presents what he calls the advocatus diaboli opinion that all statehood requirements (territory, population, government) are fulfilled. Second, he explains the meaning of recognition as a requirement for the formation of a state. And third, he sets forth the legitimacy argument by concluding that because of the lack of the rule of law, the …

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DiscussionKick-off

Is the Islamic State a State?

The so-called Islamic State has triggered a wave of commentary ever since it emerged as one of the leading military groups in Syria and further captured vast parts of Iraqi territory in mid-2014. What seems to have received only little attention this far is its legal characterization.

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Interview

„Who among us gets to be global?“

An Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

Atossa Araxia Abrahamian wrote a book entitled „The Cosmopolites“, which speaks about global citizenship in a way that is deeply informed by the theoretical discussion but at the same time rich in concrete stories. These involve stories about stateless persons, for whom their state of residence decided to buy citizenship of another state, stories about the merchandising of passports for a global elite, and stories of a man who decided …

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DiscussionResponse

‘Who may now speak’? International Lawyers and Religious Actors in Transitional Justice

A response to Ioana Cismas What is and what should be the role of faith-based actors in transitional justice (TJ)? Ioana Cismas enquires whether the engagement of TJ with religious actors strengthens or rather undermines the legitimacy and effectiveness of TJ mechanisms and their ability to lead to (at least a measure of) accountability for past abuses. Well, it depends. Ioana Cismas’s answer is nuanced and takes into account the …

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DiscussionKick-off

Religious Actors and Transitional Justice

On Legitimacy and Accountability

A teary-eyed Desmond Tutu during a public hearing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is emblematic for the South African transitional justice (TJ) process to the extent that examining the Commission’s work without recalling the archbishop’s role in its functioning could be considered a scholarly faux-pas. Hence, the question emerges: is this a unique case or are there other Tutus out there? One statistical effort documents the significant involvement of …

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Future of International LawSymposium

Die Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit löst die Rechtfertigungsprobleme internationaler Rechtsprechung nicht

Eine Replik auf Stephan Schill Internationale Rechtsprechung greift tief in unser Leben ein. Entscheidungen der Welthandelsorganisation zur Subvention grüner Energie, Urteile des Europäischen Menschenrechtsgerichtshofes zum Kruzifix in italienischen Klassenräumen oder womöglich anstehenden Urteile von Investitionsschiedsgerichten zur deutschen Energiewende, sie alle gestalten die Möglichkeiten der individuellen und kollektiven Freiheitsausübung. Internationale Rechtsprechung ist eine Ausübung öffentlicher Gewalt und wie jede öffentliche Gewalt bedarf sie einer demokratischen Legitimation. Diese Sichtweise auf internationale Gerichte—als multifunktionale …

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Future of International LawSymposium

Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit als Zentrum der globalen Judikative

Die 1990er und frühen 2000er Jahre waren eine Zeit des Enthusiasmus für das Projekt, dem Völkerrecht durch eine Vielzahl ständiger Gerichte zu stärkerer Durchsetzung zu verhelfen. Kriegsverbrechertribunale für Ex-Jugoslawien und Ruanda, internationaler Strafgerichtshof (IStGH), World Bank Inspection Panel, WTO Appellate Body, Afrikanischer Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte und zahlreiche Gerichtshöfe in regionalen Integrationsprojekten in Afrika sprossen in dieser Zeit wie Pilze aus dem Boden. Auch der Internationale Seegerichtshof (ITLOS) nahm Mitte der …

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DiscussionResponse

Judicial appointments and the right kind of politics

A response to Bilyana Petkova   Judicial appointments matter, but it is difficult to pinpoint why exactly. One possibility – mentioned by Bilyana – is that there is a connection between representation and legitimacy. It is easy to see that there is a link. Large groups in society might lose trust in the legal system if they are systematically underrepresented on the bench. However, the link is nebulous and never …

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DiscussionKick-off

Selecting Europe’s Judges: on the Evolving Legitimacy of Appointments in Luxembourg and Strasbourg

What is judicial legitimacy?

The concept of legitimacy is a favorite debate among many political philosophers and lawyers. Since our perceptions of what is legitimate change over time, we look at legitimacy not as a static concept but as one evolving over time. Judicial appointments, particularly to constitutional, federal and international courts have always been a sensitive matter. In Europe, the impartiality and professional merit of both domestic and supranational judges are becoming a …

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