DiscussionResponse

Die UNO als Kopie antiker Vorbilder?

Vom Nutzen und Nachteil eines Anachronismus

Kommentar zum Beitrag von Jorrik Fulda In seinem aufschlussreichen Beitrag argumentiert Jorrik Fulda, dass die Vereinten Nationen als System kollektiver Sicherheit dem antiken Modell der Koine Eirene (κοινὴ εἰρήνη) oder Amphiktyonie nachgebildet sind, einem Bündnis griechischer Stadtstaaten, das der Pflege eines gemeinsamen Kultes und der Verteidigung verpflichtet war. Beide seien partikular – und „auf die realpolitische Unterstützung durch einen ambivalenten Hegemon angewiesen“. Fulda geht auf Parallelen und Unterschiede ein, vergleicht …

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DiscussionKick-off

Globale Koine Eirene?

Der antike Ursprung der Vereinten Nationen

Die UN und das Prinzip der kollektiven Sicherheit sind aus der heutigen Weltpolitik nicht mehr wegzudenken. Doch was kaum jemand weiß: ähnliche multilaterale Friedensverträge gab es schon in der griechischen Antike. Dort wurden sie Koine Eirene (griech.: Allgemeiner Frieden) oder Amphiktyonie genannt. Ist unser heutiges globales Friedenssystem nur eine Kopie der Antike? Welche Probleme ergeben sich daraus für die Universalität der Globalordnung? Im Jahre 2015 feierten wir 70 Jahre Vereinte …

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Current Developments

Responsibility-sharing for refugees (2)

Can global solutions avoid contributing to the legal production of superfluity?

I have argued in the previous post, how states’ regulation of borders and the global question of responsibility sharing relate: Not only does the securization of borders in one place shift responsibility for refugees to other states. Strategies of containment have shaped today’s international structure of protection much more generally, including the growing role of humanitarian actors and the corresponding expansion of humanitarian reason in reactions to displacement. These dynamics …

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Current Developments

Responsibility-sharing for refugees (1)

Law’s production of superfluity as an analytical lens

When the German Minister of the Interior a few weeks ago announced that “the refugee crisis has not been resolved, but its solution is on a very good way”, he was obviously not speaking about the global situation. He was referring to the situation in Europe and particularly in Germany, where after the successive closure of the Balkan route and the agreement between the EU and Turkey in March (as …

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Interview

„Who among us gets to be global?“

An Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

Atossa Araxia Abrahamian wrote a book entitled „The Cosmopolites“, which speaks about global citizenship in a way that is deeply informed by the theoretical discussion but at the same time rich in concrete stories. These involve stories about stateless persons, for whom their state of residence decided to buy citizenship of another state, stories about the merchandising of passports for a global elite, and stories of a man who decided …

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Current Developments

International Law – So 90s?

On periodization and the 1990s as crystallization point for contemporary International Law

The international legal order finds itself in turmoil. The crises in Ukraine and Syria, the questioning of the authority of the ECtHR, the opposition against the ICC by African states and the rise of global terrorism can all be interpreted as crisis symptoms justifying the need for a (re-)assessment of the current state and future of International Law.  

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Ranganathan Book SymposiumSymposium

Ranganathan Book Symposium: Part 5

Response from the author

I am grateful to all participants of this symposium for their thoughtful and generous commentaries. The strange truth about book-writing, which I suppose all experienced hands know (and I discovered as a first-time author), is the void that follows once the manuscript is finished. The book then disappears into the publishing process, and gradually snakes on to the desks and reading lists of other scholars. The author might wait months …

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Ranganathan Book SymposiumSymposium

Ranganathan Book Symposium: Part 4

Lea Wisken: Putting legal concepts into political context

Surabhi Ranganathan’s book on strategically created treaty conflicts is a must-read for international lawyers and International Relations scholars interested in fragmentation and regulatory overlap. The choice of the subject-matter alone shows that Ranganathan puts legal concepts into political context. She outlines the inherent limits of international law which cannot prevent states from creating new treaties to undermine existing commitments. However, international law may constrain policy-makers by steering them towards legal …

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Ranganathan Book SymposiumSymposium

Ranganathan Book Symposium: Part 3

Jan Klabbers: Conflicts as Solutions

Some years ago, I published a slender book on the topic of treaty conflict. Zooming in on the treaty relations of member states of the EU, I found that international law had little to say about treaty conflicts involving different parties. If party A has incompatible treaty obligations with states B and C, then it just has to make a choice or, as a German scholar (and later EU judge) …

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Ranganathan Book SymposiumSymposium

Ranganathan Book Symposium: Part 2

Jasper Finke: Views of a Skeptical Formalist

Let me start with a confession: I am a formalist, at least to a certain extent, and a pragmatist, at least when it comes to treaty conflicts in international law – which is why Surabhi’s book „Strategically Created Treaty Conflicts and the Politics of International Law” was not an easy read for me. This assessment, however, reveals more about myself and how I (would) approach the topic than it does …

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