DiscussionResponse

Who may see the Acropolis? Global patterns of inequality and the right to tourism

In her contribution on the newly created right to tourism, Sabrina Tremblay-Huet convincingly states, that the social and economic phenomenon of tourism has been widely disregarded by the social sciences, law and philosophy due to the focus of the academia on migration. However, there are many reasons to highlight the growing relevance of tourism in world society: First, the tourist sector generates by now 10 percent of the world’s GDP. …

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DiscussionResponse

Rethinking containment through the EU-Libya Migration Deal

In response to Nils Muiznieks, Human Rights Commissioner of the Council of Europe who asked Italy to clarify its relationships with Libyan militia, the Italian Prime Minister Marco Minniti declared on October 11 that Italy’s goal is twofold: “to prevent migrant crossing which put life at risk […] and to grant that international standards are respected in Libya”. Minniti’s speech should be analysed in the light of the recent overt …

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DiscussionKick-off

Brother, where art thou?

Libya, spaces of violence and the diffusion of knowledge

The key political question in recent months has been how to reduce the number of unauthorized migrants that arrive to Europe’s shores in rickety vessels from politically unstable countries in North Africa. The overwhelming majority of the more than 134.000 migrants that arrived by sea to Europe this year landed on Italian shores (approximately 103.300). Most of the migrants landing in Italy departed from wartorn Libya. Italy seems to have …

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Feminist Critiques of International CourtsSymposium

Judgment and diversity

Thinking with Hannah Arendt about the composition of international court benches

If the number of female judges in an international tribunal is one out of twenty-one, as in the case of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS), we can assume that there is a problem. Not because a woman’s judgment would necessarily and predictably be different, as Selen Kazan has discussed. But, as Nienke Grossman also explains here, because women are just as qualified to serve as …

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Current DevelopmentsEvent

Grenzenloses Recht. Dem Völkerrechtshistoriker Jörg Fisch zum 70. Geburtstag

Wie universal kann ein eurozentrisch geprägtes Völkerrecht sein? Und wie lässt sich vermeiden, dass faktische Ungleichheit eine internationale Rechtsordnung sprengt, die seit der Dekolonisierung als Recht zwischen Gleichen ausgestaltet ist? Mit diesen Fragen hat sich der Zürcher Historiker Jörg Fisch schon in seiner 1984 veröffentlichten Bielefelder Habilitationsschrift „Die europäische Expansion und das Völkerrecht“ befasst – einer bahnbrechenden Studie über „die Auseinandersetzungen um den Status der überseeischen Gebiete vom 15. Jahrhundert …

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DiscussionResponse

Die UNO als Kopie antiker Vorbilder?

Vom Nutzen und Nachteil eines Anachronismus

Kommentar zum Beitrag von Jorrik Fulda In seinem aufschlussreichen Beitrag argumentiert Jorrik Fulda, dass die Vereinten Nationen als System kollektiver Sicherheit dem antiken Modell der Koine Eirene (κοινὴ εἰρήνη) oder Amphiktyonie nachgebildet sind, einem Bündnis griechischer Stadtstaaten, das der Pflege eines gemeinsamen Kultes und der Verteidigung verpflichtet war. Beide seien partikular – und „auf die realpolitische Unterstützung durch einen ambivalenten Hegemon angewiesen“. Fulda geht auf Parallelen und Unterschiede ein, vergleicht …

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DiscussionKick-off

Globale Koine Eirene?

Der antike Ursprung der Vereinten Nationen

Die UN und das Prinzip der kollektiven Sicherheit sind aus der heutigen Weltpolitik nicht mehr wegzudenken. Doch was kaum jemand weiß: ähnliche multilaterale Friedensverträge gab es schon in der griechischen Antike. Dort wurden sie Koine Eirene (griech.: Allgemeiner Frieden) oder Amphiktyonie genannt. Ist unser heutiges globales Friedenssystem nur eine Kopie der Antike? Welche Probleme ergeben sich daraus für die Universalität der Globalordnung? Im Jahre 2015 feierten wir 70 Jahre Vereinte …

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Current Developments

Responsibility-sharing for refugees (2)

Can global solutions avoid contributing to the legal production of superfluity?

I have argued in the previous post, how states’ regulation of borders and the global question of responsibility sharing relate: Not only does the securization of borders in one place shift responsibility for refugees to other states. Strategies of containment have shaped today’s international structure of protection much more generally, including the growing role of humanitarian actors and the corresponding expansion of humanitarian reason in reactions to displacement. These dynamics …

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Current Developments

Responsibility-sharing for refugees (1)

Law’s production of superfluity as an analytical lens

When the German Minister of the Interior a few weeks ago announced that “the refugee crisis has not been resolved, but its solution is on a very good way”, he was obviously not speaking about the global situation. He was referring to the situation in Europe and particularly in Germany, where after the successive closure of the Balkan route and the agreement between the EU and Turkey in March (as …

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Interview

„Who among us gets to be global?“

An Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

Atossa Araxia Abrahamian wrote a book entitled „The Cosmopolites“, which speaks about global citizenship in a way that is deeply informed by the theoretical discussion but at the same time rich in concrete stories. These involve stories about stateless persons, for whom their state of residence decided to buy citizenship of another state, stories about the merchandising of passports for a global elite, and stories of a man who decided …

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