Discussion

Dense Struggle (IV): The Ghostly Real

This post appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking. As I mentioned in the last post, one of the most perplexing circumstances that surrounded the appearance of the ghost in the refuge was that it occurred at the precise moment at which the group of IDPs formally entered into the realm of the official. It could have easily occurred earlier, when they were protesting, in perhaps more difficult conditions, at Plaza de Bolívar or Parque …

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Discussion

Dense Struggle (III): The Modern Uncanny

This post appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking. In the last two posts I have argued that the longue durée of capitalist modernity has implied an expansion of a material and social global ordering, and that this process is far from being free of emotional forces, even of an uncanny dimension. In my account, this expansion of capitalist modernity — with its patterns of global accumulation, wealth distribution, jurisdictional realms, administrative procedures and legal forms — has been accompanied …

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Discussion

Dense Struggle (II): Oh yes, that, our world

This post appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking. In the preamble of the Communist Manifesto (1848), Marx and Engels made the famous dictum: “A spectre is haunting Europe — the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.” History has proven Marx and Engels correct. Communism was not only in the rising. Counter-revolutionary forces …

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Discussion

Dense Struggle (I): Violence and the otherworldly

This post appeared first on Critical Legal Thinking. How can we make sense of popular struggles in this period of late capitalist modernity? What do the experiences, voices, and visions of groups involved in such struggles tell us about the actual functioning of our world — a world mined with growing inequalities, ever more intrusive levels of governance and managerial techniques, all of this held together by the increasing ubiquity of law? …

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Allegra - Transitional Justice

On harm and history

Transitional Justice is an important emerging theme in legal anthropology. Völkerrechtsblog will explore this theme through a collaboration with the blog ‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ and re-post their series ‘Transitional Justice under the anthropological microscope’. I want to begin with Julia´s history, an indigenous woman from the South of Colombia who currently lives in one of Bogotá’s massive shantytowns. Her life speaks of a series of tragic …

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