Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: The Author’s Response

Markus Gunneflo: Writing the History of Columbus Arriving in Haiti

I could not be happier that this book symposium turned out to be a forum for such wide-ranging and critical commentary about targeted killing. All contributors offer nuanced readings of my book while extending the analysis in several significant directions. In appreciation of both these aspects I want to use this opportunity for a brief response to describe the scope of the book – drawing on the contributors reading of …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 5

Jothie Rajah: Targeted Killing and Spectacular War

1. In October 2015, some four and a half years after the Osama bin Laden killing, the New York Times disclosed that weeks before the Abbottabad raid, federal lawyers had engaged in “[s]tretching sparse precedents” to produce “rationales intended to overcome any legal obstacles”. With these disclosures, the apparently extra-legal killing of bin Laden took on a second life as a hyper-legal killing; a killing authorised by precedent and legal …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 4

Karin Loevy: Law’s Compulsion or Coming out of the Shadows

On a clear November morning in 2000, Hussein Abayat, a senior official in the Fatah faction Tanzim, was killed by a hellfire anti-tank missile fired from an Israeli helicopter. When the incident was announced later that day, instead of the regular official denial of any direct involvement by Israel in the attack, the Israeli defense minister went on live radio, openly boasting that the IDF did it. I was a …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 3

Nahed Samour: Targeted Killing, Revisiting Hobbes: No Protection, No Obedience

Markus Gunneflo’s book shows how the normalization of targeted killing emerged through extensive legal work. Offering a meticulous account of history and practice, the book highlights the law and politics of protection in the dispute on killing to protect. Hobbes crafted his state sovereignty in Leviathan “with no other design than to set before men’s eyes the mutual relation between protection and obedience”.[1] Targeted killing is a response to the …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 2

Ioannis Kalpouzos: On the Constitution of Global Asymmetric Warfare

It is worth repeating that the suggestion that drone technology constitutes a ‘paradigm change’ and a ‘break with the past’ in the international law of force is of limited heuristic value. Both the descriptive accuracy and normative implications of this position have been challenged. Notably, such stark peridiocization may have pernicious effects, especially in naturalizing the promise of a ‘new way of war’ associated with the distanced precision of drone …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Gunneflo Book Symposium: Part 1

Itamar Mann: Israel and the Forever War

1. On 4 January 2017, a military court in Jaffa convicted Israeli soldier Elor Azaria of manslaughter. The case has set Israeli public debate ablaze for almost a year now, and was widely reported abroad. As a video released by the human rights group Betselem revealed, Abd Al Fatah A-Sharif was wounded and lying, face down, when Azaria approached and shot a bullet through his head. A-Sharif had stabbed an …

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Gunneflo Book SymposiumSymposium

Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History

A Book Symposium

Over the coming weeks, the Völkerrechtsblog will host an online symposium on the recently published book Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History (CUP 2016) by Markus Gunneflo. Markus Gunneflo is a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer in public international law at Lund University in Sweden. The book will be discussed by Itamar Mann (Haifa), Ioannis Kalpouzos (London), Nahed Samour (Helsinki), Karin Loevy (NYU) and Jothie Rajah (American Bar Foundation, Chicago). …

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